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Skinningrove Mine and Loftus Valley

Skinningrove Mine and Loftus Valley

A panorama of Skinningrove valley. The mine is on the left, with overmen’s cottages next to the trestle bridge which crosses the beck to the drift into the bottom of Loftus north mine, the shaft used to hoist ironstone to the works. On the left the white enclosure of the newly built picking belt (1907), for cleaning the ironstone can be seen. Towards Mill bank, the mine rail sidings cross the beck this was originally extended to the old Whitecliffe mine. Kilton Viaduct is yet to be filled in, with Liverton mine above it. and the rail zig zag skirts the right hand side down the valley. Image courtesy of Jean Carass.

Skinningrove Mine

Skinningrove Mine

An interesting photo of the mine predating the installation of the picking belt (1907). the boiler chimney and steam from the Fan engine are clearly seen, The extensive stables complex for the mine horses (not ponys), dominates the centre of the photo. In the rail sidings a rake of wagons are loaded with ironstone. And towards mill bank is the stockyard stacked with timber for pit props. On The eastern side of the valley behind the mine is seen deepdale wood this slowly disappeared under a mountain of shale in later years.Image courtesy of Olive Bennett.

Clearing the Tank Defences

Clearing the Tank Defences

Do you remember the large blocks above Skinningrove Beach? We have a collection of images of the work taking place; this is the first. We have no dates for this work can anybody assist?
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.

Heavy Hammer Work

Heavy Hammer Work

Splitting the blocks must have been a job! We wondered when the blocks were removed and Colin now advises us: ”The blocks must have been removed between 1977 and 1981 as one of the blocks reads MUFC (Manchester United Football Club) FA Cup 1977 .” Colin also tell us: ” These blocks were a great challenge for all us ”’grovers”; there was about 20 of them each had about a six foot gap between them and it was a great achievement when you could start at the top and jump from block to block all the way to the bottom.”
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection and many thanks to Colin for the updates.

Tricky Manoevering Required

Tricky Manoevering Required

This image shows how the blocks would have impeded all but foot traffic.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection

Tricky Manoevering Still Required

Tricky Manoevering Still Required

How easy it would be to get even the very mobile digger jammed, no wonder they could stop tanks.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection

Clearing the Debris

Clearing the Debris

The final stages with the mounds of rubble being piled up prior to removal.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection

Skinningrove Station Before Beeching

Skinningrove Station when it was a working station; this view gives a proper idea of how close to Carlin How and how far away from Skinningrove. In the background right can be seen the chimneys of the steel works.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.

After Closure

Skinningrove Station and the buildings gone; only the platform and sign remain to indicate where it stood.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.

Road Opening 1925

Road Opening 1925

The official opening of the Whitby to Sandsend road on 7th November 1925, this image is from an original taken by Tom Watson of Lythe. He had been commissioned to record the week by week progress of this activity.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.