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Egton Bridge and the River Esk

Egton Bridge and the River Esk

An early 20th century postcard view of Egton Bridge and the river Esk; how quiet it all seems.
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah

View of Glaisdale

View of Glaisdale

This postcard view was un-posted and we have no knowledge of the publisher; however from the handwritten inscription it is believed to be from the early 2oth century.
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah

Rosedale East

Rosedale East

The calcining plant at Rosedale Mines. We are told by Simon Chapman: ”This is the plant installed in the 1920s to recover a mound of calcined ironstone dust tipped below the kilns at Rosedale. It had been dumped there in the past because it was unsuitable for smelting originally but later could be used because of improvements in metallurgy. Similar equipment was installed below the other kilns at Rosedale East but the dust mound in front of the West kilns still remains. Recovery of this material kept the railway open for a couple of years after the mines closed in 1926.”  

(photo courtesy of Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum and thanks to Simon for the information)

Rosedale

Rosedale

As the caption says Rosedale Mineral Railway 1860-1926, what more can I say?
(photo courtesy of Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum)

Bank Top Terminus – Rosedale West

Bank Top Terminus - Rosedale West

North Eastern Railway Terminus 1,000 feet above sea level and that is as much as I know about it and I read that off the caption. Now believed to be on the Rosedale end of the Rosedale to Ingleby Greenhow railway system. Thanks to Mark T for the update.

Rodney Begg tells us: ”Scarborough Archeological Publication “Research Report No. 9″ on the Rosedale Mines and Railway: “West Rosedale Bank Top, circa 1911.  Engine shed on left and railway cottages on right. Snow-ploughs on siding with traces of other sidings formerly extending to calcining kilns.” The cottages still exist and were inhabited last time I visited the area (some while back now).  A good way to get to this area and enjoy a walk as well is to join the track bed across the road from The Lion Inn on Blakey Ridge and turn right. Follow the track bed and eventually you will end up at this; the terminus at West Rosedale. On the way you will visit the site of Sheriff’s Pit, the only shaft mine in this system.”

Image courtesy of Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum and thanks to Rodney Begg for the update)

Rosedale Works

Rosedale Works

A busy day at Rosedale works I am informed thst the west works started in 1857 and the east side in 1859. Simon Chapman provides us with the following: ”This is a view of the Rosedale East Mines in the 1920s. Central in the picture is a chute for loading ironstone direct into railway wagons, while in the background, behind the white hut, a gantry spans the railway; this was the apparatus for recovering the calcine dust from below the iron-fronted or New Kilns. The wagons in the foreground are empty tubs from out of the pit.
Right in the background, behind the ramshackle tipping huts, can be seen the cottages and workshops at High Baring.
The Rosedale West Mines opened in the mid-1850s and the East Mines about 1865.”
(photo courtesy of Cleveland ironstone mining museum and grateful thanks to Simon for the dating information)