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Baxter Sisters 1908

Pictured are the Baxter girls, in Carlin How and the picture is believed to date from about 1908. The Archive is reliably informed that their names are (standing): Mabel, May, Emmy. Seated Gertrude (Dot), Evelyn (Eva). Any further assistance in identifying the family would be welcomed.

Image and details courtesy of Dr Sandra Sellick, Canada.

Silver Star Dance Band

Do you remember dancing the night away to the Silver Star Dance band? Ann Robinson advises: ” They lived in Skelton and played at local dance halls all over East Cleveland and were resident band at The Royal Hotel in Whitby. They were all one family (The Robinson’s); Syd (father) played accordion, Ida (mother) played piano, Joan (daughter) played drums, Ken (son) played trumpet and Lew (son) played saxophone and clarinet. “

Image and information courtesy of Ann Robinson (Lew’s wife).

Thatched Cottage, Brotton

A further thatched cottage, believed to be close to the Ship Inn (on the rear part of Brotton High Street) and behind the present day Spar convenience store. It is believed that the thatched cottage is no more; having been replaced by a two storey Victorian brick building. The image when it came to the Archive did not have the details as listed on the image (‘SEE BACK’), so any additional information about the building or dating would be very welcome. Julie Riddiough has advised the Archive: ” The building to the right on the picture was The Shoemakers Arms”. Bill Danby (whilst conducting other researches) has advised the Archive of an entry for Skelton and Brotton District Council that on 6th July 1934 – demolition of 129 High Street, Brotton; Thatched Cottage.

Image courtesy of The David Linton Collection and thanks to Julie Riddiough for that update, also to Bill Danby for the actual demolition date of the building.

Old Green Tree Hotel, Brotton

A view of the Old Green Tree Hotel, Brotton; with plenty of bystanders to fill the picture for the photographer. Dating was not a problem, Nivard Ovington came to the rescue and his assistance is given further in this post. Note that the building as well as having a thatched roof only has a window in the gable end, no upper storey as the building has had since pre 1913 (based on a postcard view elsewhere on the Archive). Also the shop front to the left of this view, is now a series of houses before The Penfold and the more modern Spar convenience store. Nivard Ovington has assisted with: “The alterations were between 1901 and 1906. ‘Daily Gazette’ for Middlesbrough March 13th 1900: “Today at Guisborough Police Court Mr W RICHARDSON, solicitor, applied on behalf of Mr T WEBSTER, for sanction to alterations to the Green Tree Inn Brotton. Thus was a thatched house, 200 years old, and had been in the occupation of the present tenants family for over a century. Application granted”. ‘Daily Gazette’ for Middlesbrough March 6th 1906: “There is a report of an application by the landlord of the Green Tree Inn Brotton, requesting a seven day licence as there was at present only a six day licence, it is mentioned that it had recently been rebuilt. Application was refused. It was mentioned that when George WEBSTER took the Green Tree over in 1878 it was a seven day licence but he gave up the seventh day as he was a farmer as well, since then it was a 6 day whereas all other public houses were open seven days”. In 1907 the licence for the Green Tree was transferred to Robert Henry HEAD. ‘Whitby Gazette’ February 7th 1908: “Robert Henry HEAD of the Green Tree Brotton applied for a seven day licence. Its mentioned that the Green Tree had been rebuilt ‘five or six years ago’. The seven day licence was granted”. I descend from the WEBSTERs mentioned above, the earliest I have them there is 1823. 1823 ‘Baines Directory of Brotton’: Webster Richard , victualler : Green Tree.
But they were clearly there longer than that, Richard WEBSTER born 1767 at Brotton was my g.g.g.g.grandfather. In the photograph the man standing in the left doorway is probably Thomas WEBSTER”.

Image courtsey of The David Linton Collection and many thanks to Nivard Ovington for his assistance in dating and names of possible people in the image.

Red Lion Place, Redcar?

Another mystery which we would love some assistance in solving! This photograph came to the Archive with a request for any information; is Red Lion Place in Recar? There is a Red Lion Street, which links to Lord Street and was opposite a linking street to the High Street, so named by the Red Lion Hotel which was on the other end corner to the High Street; perhaps this shop was close by? Who is the young lady in the shop doorway and does anybody have an idea as to the date? Peter Sotheran suggests: ” Red Lion Place – was this at the southern end of Red Lion Street on land that is now a turning point for vehicles and close the the railway line?”

Image courtesy of Lynsey Peart, thanks to Peter Sotheran for the update.

Moorsholm Cricket Club Winners in 1914

Pictured having won the Cleveland Minor Cricket League in 1914, Moorsholm Cricket Club. Back row: Jordan Jackson, Richard Stevenson, Harry Johnson, William Wren, Tom Shaw, Will Hodgson, Tom Clark, Harry Armstrong, Robert Holliday, George Dove. Middle row: Jimmy Brown, Page Ward, Albion Smith, Arthur Barker, William Catron, Jack Popplewell, Jack Hodgson. Front row: Mr. Greenwood, ??.

This image (from a postcard) came to the Archive without names, following enquiries and directing to Keith Harding there was success!! We will probably featuring further images of Moorsholm Cricket Club following a kind invitation. Can anybody assist with the missing name?

Image courtesy of Geoff Kitching and thanks to Keith Harding (Moorsholm Cricket Club) for the names.

Dormanstown Caravan

The title of this images gives a hint of the link to another image on the Archive of the ‘First House in Dormanstown’, Geoff Kitching brought this image to the Archive with information regarding possible use for the caravan; the reverse bearing the annotation: “Caravan dwelling at 1st house to be built”; whilst Bill Kitching advised: “Workers would come in to work and possibly hire a caravan as accommodation as there would be limited places to stay and it would probably be cheaper”. As the Kitching family had information about a relative; Arch Aubrey who worked as a plasterer for the company erecting the Dorlonco houses, he was visited by his parents and unidentified children, they are believed to be the people in the picture. Alfred Aubrey and his wife Annie, had four daughters (Grace, Ruth, Gwendoline and Winifred) which the Archive can only suppose they may be those in the photograph. The picture must have been taken early in 1918 as there do not appear to be many other houses visible.

Image and information courtesy of Geoff Kitching, additional information via Ancestry and Find My Past websites.

Lumpsey Surface Workers

There is some doubt about this image, whether it is of Lumpsey mine surface workers or is it Skinningrove works? The archive would again welcome comments as to who might be in the photograph and where the photograph was taken.

Image courtesy of Geoff Kitching.

Huntcliffe Surface Workers

This image (from a postcard produced by J. E. Huntrodd of Brotton) is of surface workers from Huntcliffe mine, the clue is in their clothing and particularly their trousers. When supplied (by Geoff Kitching) he commented about atleast two people in the image can also be found in the image ‘Lumpsey 2’. The gentleman on the back row (now known to be Mr Ralph Clough, Mine Engineer) he was at Huntcliffe and  moved to Lumpsey; also the miner in the front row (with a terrier dog) also features in the same Lumpsey image. There may be other matches but leave it to eagle-eyed viewers to assist. Any assistance with names would be welcomed. 

Image courtesy of Geoff Kitching, with researches courtesy of Tom Kitching .

North Loftus Mine and Miners

When first sent to the Archive, this image was believed to be of miners in the late 19th century or early 20th century at Loftus mine, this was based on the building in the background. Researches have revealed that the structure is possibly part of the original North Loftus mine; this was inside Skinningrove Works. The building is visible in many images of the works and the roof windows bear an uncanny resemblance to those in this image, hence the title. However, the Archive would welcome comments or information to assist or verify which mine this is!

Image courtesy of Geoff Kitching.