Recent Comments

Archives

St Michael's Church Interior

St Michael's Church Interior

St Michaels chancel arch; a rare survivor from the Norman period. The arch was covered until the restoration brought it to view in the 19th century. Viewed from the nave, the outer arch has beak head carvings; the two inner carvings have zig zag or chevron mouldings. The capitals on each side of the arch depicting scenes from the Bible,

St Michael’s Liverton

St michael's Liverton

St Michael’s Church in Liverton village. A Victorian restoration, traces of the Norman masonry, can be seen in the nave walls, and the chancel arch; with elaborate sculptures on the capitals. This is one of the finest survival’s in the north.

Quaker Burial Ground

Quaker Burial Ground

Old Liverton, stone dated 1693.
The Quaker burial ground at Liverton is located at Red House farm. Dating from about 1669 to the early 1800’s, it is believed that up to 50 persons are interred there. Little is known about the Society of Friends in the area, But may have started after the visit by the founder George Fox preaching in Cleveland around 1654.
Image courtesy of The Pem Holliday Collection, additional information courtesy of Dr Alastair Laurence ’History of Liverton’.

Moorsholm Hotel

Moorsholm Hotel

This grand building at Moorsholm, in a sad condition, was intended to be a hotel, part of the proposed station buildings on Paddy Waddles Railway. Which would run from Kilton Junction to Glaisdale, relics of this incomplete line can still be traced along the route. Ann Jackson tells us: ”The house was owned by the Marsay family. My great grandad James Jackson was a stone mason and worked on Paddy Waddells Railway.”
Image courtesy of Eric Johnson and thanks to Ann for that update..

Liverton Waterfall

Liverton Waterfall

It must have been cold back in January, 1982. 

Thanks to Janet Wilson for this wonderful image.  I hadn’t realised the scale of these falls until I noticed the young woman (Janet?) sitting on the rocks below.

Liverton Church

Liverton Church

A view of Liverton church, taken in January, 1982.

Image courtesy of Mrs. J. Wilson.

The Close, Liverton

The Close, Liverton

This image shows the farmworkers’ houses that stood in ’The Close’, Liverton Village.  Janet Wilson tells us: ”The boy standing in the gateway is Steven Barnes, his family lived in the house with the orange door.”The houses were demolished in 1984.

Thanks to Mrs. Janet Wilson for this image and the information.

Liverton Mines

Liverton Mines

I think about 1937 after the movement in the mines.

Living At Swindale Farm

Living At Swindale Farm

Another of Neil Sucklings photo’s showing Fred Suckling and his famiy who lived at Swindale farm Moorsholm. Anne Davies tells us: ”My father Harold  Pallister & mother Freda  farmed at Swindale farm Moorsholm from 1955 till 1964  he was a tenant farmer farm owned by Ringrose  Wharton (now Skelton Gilling Estates) at that time my sister Linda and I  went to Moorsholm school we had a 2mile walk to and from school in 1963 we were cut off from the village for 3weeks because of heavy snow drifted over the hedges.”

Image courtesy of Neil Suckiling and many thanks to Anne for that update.

Cleveland Street, Liverton Mines

Cleveland Street

This newspaper report of building destruction caused by mine subsidence shows the interior of a house in Cleveland Street, Liverton Mines. Destroyed by the look of it and yet the houses still stand today. Now am I right in saying that or were there two rows to Cleveland Street one of them being demolished? HELP

Page 1 of 41234