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Sandsend Ness

Sandsend Ness

The sea wall and Sandsend Ness. The building in this postcard is part of the old alum works it was cleared away to provide a car park.
A Judges postcard courtesy Maurice Grayson.

Boulby Alum Quarry

Boulby Alum Quarry

The remains of the alum quarry at Boulby, although the pyramid shape at the top of the photograph is such a prominent feature of this part of the site, it is not in fact anything special. It appears to be sitting on top of a general quarrying level but is only composed of earth and stones from above the alum shale layer so is a tip of overburden dumped here to allow the sandstone from beneath its original position to be removed and thus expose the alum shale. It has probably been a larger tip originally which has been eroded to its current distinctive shape. It was probably formed by building out a wooden gantry from the cliff face so that the removed material could be dumped well clear of the intended quarry face.

Image courtesy of Alan Richardson and information kindly supplied by Simon Chapman.

Parsons Byers Quarry

Parsons Byers Quarry?

This view of a double track railway incline, is believed to be one of several located in Weardale, so although outside our area has strong connections owi ng to the iron and steel industry, hence the inclusion on our site. The quarries were used for the limestone for the iron and steel industry.A similar arrangement was in operation at Ingelby incline, which was part of the Rosedale Railway. Chris Twigg tells us: ”The location certainly looks like it could be Parson Byers, which was owned by Bell Brothers and Dorman Long so a good chance of a picture ending up in our area”.   David Richardson also advises: ”Yes it is the incline head of Parson Byers Quarries, the track disappearing behind the trees to the right of the photo heads around to the main quarry.”

Very little changed at the incline between the 1890′s and 1920′s but the photo was likely taken in that 30 year period.

Any further information will be welcome.

Image courtesy of Maurice Grayson; also thanks to Chris and David for those updates.

Alum House

Alum House

Joyce Dobson loaned us this rather good photo of the alum house at Hummersea all the others I have seen the house has been in ruins.

Would You Enter This?

Would You Enter This?

Maybe I would ’cos I am nosey, it’s the entrance to the alum mine on Hummersea beach.

Chris Twigg tells us: ”Rather than a mine, it was connected by a shaft to the Alum House on the cliff top. Presumably to allow the transportation of goods in and out.The alum shale was actually been quarried on the cliff top to the west.”
(photo courtesy of Julie Morrisonand update from Chris Twigg)

Tracks To?

Tracks To?

At one time well used tracks but now rusting and decaying, but what brick work on that tunnel, believed to have been built in the 17th century.
(photo courtesy of Julie Morrison and update from Chris Twigg)

Damp And Musty

Damp And Musty

You can almost smell the damp in this part of the tunnel, I wonder who were the last workers here, anyone got any photographs of the alum workers?
(photo courtesy of Julie Morrison)

Unsafe Beam

Unsafe Beam

Doesn’t fill you with confidence to go much farther into the tunnel does it?
(photo courtesy of Julie Morrison)

Rock Fall

Rock Fall

Looks like some climbing to do to get any farther into the tunnel.
(photo courtesy of Julie Morrison)

Blocked

Blocked

I don’t know how far in the tunnel these people went but here it is blocked by a fall of rock.
(photo courtesy of Julie Morrison)

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