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The Saltburn Cafe 6

This final image finally has some staff(?) in view, that is the assumption; with a person behind the cafe counter. Although the two ladies in the door way can also be seen in the first interior view; standing in the double doors looking out over the front steps from the corner of Spa Bank and the lower promenade. Do you know whom they are?

Image and information courtesy of Reg Wilson, additional information courtesy of Ancestry, Find My Past and Callum Brown.

The Saltburn Cafe 5

This fourth interior view (which if in the correct sequence should go between images 2 and 3), has a noticeboard which includes a poster for “The Little Theatre – Cabaret” with the opening night on July 9th. Year unknown, as yet; perhaps one of our watchers can assist? As with other pictures in this sequence, very few customers can be seen.

Image and information courtesy of Reg Wilson, additional information courtesy of Ancestry, Find My Past and Callum Brown.

The Saltburn Cafe 4

This third interior view, obviously pans further round the cafe, showing the staircase to the upper floor. The use of windsor style of chairs give an idea of the quantity of customers the cafe could cater for at any one time. I have memories of the cafe in the 1950s, when with my mother of tea and other refreshments could be purchased from the cafe and taken to the beach. The crockery was a more basic white crockery; but complete with tea pot and was always returned to the cafe after use. No throw-away paper or plastic in those days; and obviously breakages must have had to be paid for! Does any of our watchers rmember these times.

Image and information courtesy of Reg Wilson, additional information courtesy of Ancestry, Find My Past and Callum Brown.

The Saltburn Cafe 3

This view, number three in the series, is almost a reverse of the previous image; looking toward the side entance from Spa Bank. Obviously the wooden slatted chairs would be more easily stored when only the inside seating could be utilised in the event of inclement weather. Researches have revealed that by the 1939 Census Betty had married Alan Swift and moved to live in Middlesex. Reg Wilson was told by his mother: “Alan Ward was a notable cricketer”. The Archive is still researching this detail, Alan Swift in the 1939 Censu is recorded as an Assistant Solicitor;but would welcome any additional inforamtion our viewers can add.

Image and information courtesy of Reg Wilson, additional information courtesy of Ancestry, Find My Past and Callum Brown.

The Saltburn Cafe 2

The second postcard view of The Saltburn Cafe, is the first of a series of five interior views of the cafe; looking out towards the pier (complete with the then familiar shelter on the end. Reg Wilson advised “My mother could remember that the manageress at that time was a Betty Osborne.” By the time of the 1939 Census (taken at the outbreak of WWII) the occupants of the cafe (which included accommodation in the upper storey) was a Miriam Osborne (55 year old widowed mother of Betty) and others. The glass topped tables and ratan chairs are very typical of that period, as well as the patterned crockery on the tables; giving an idea of the high status the cafe may had at that time.

Image and information courtesy of Reg Wilson, additional information courtesy of Ancestry, Find My Past and Callum Brown.

The Saltburn Cafe 1

Today it is known as ‘Vista Mar’, but in the 1930s it was known as The Saltburn Cafe, featured in this series of postcard views; starting with an exterior view from Spa Bank towards Huntcliffe. Reg Wilson tells the Archive: “My mother worked at the cafe in the 1930s and had many happy memories of her time there.”

Image and information courtesy of Reg Wilson, additional information courtesy of Ancestry, Find My Past and Callum Brown.

Caravan Park – Saltburn – 1960’s

A different view of the caravan park at Saltburn; another Dennis postcard view shows a variety of caravans and towing vehicles with a post mark of September 1966. Obviously some were not touring much judging by their size and little ‘huts’ free-standing beside them. How different to the present day; from the days well before Tingdene with the chalet buildings and large ‘static’ caravans brought to site by trailer, rather than towed in by proud owners. Kenneth Coulthard advises: “I can see our caravan in this shot. Used to visit most weekends whenever schools were closed. Loved it.”

Image courtesy of Julie Tyrka and thanks to Kenneth Coulthard for the update.

Saltburn Caravan Park 1960’s

This image of Saltburn Caravan Park in the 1960’s (from a Dennis postcard dated 1966) shows the present day entrance to the Hazelgrove Residential Park with the chalet type buildings. Although there appear to be many almost ‘static’ type of caravans rather than tourers, judging by their size and adjacent structures. Today a very different aspect would be afforded from the same view-point.

Image courtesy of Julie Tyrka. 

Saltburn Possibly 1918?

 

This postcard image of ‘Chocolini’s’ corner in modern-day Saltburn is believed to show the Peace Celebrations at the end of the First World War; based upon the variety of flags, Boy Scouts being present and numbers of uniformed persons present.Researches have indicated that the Vicar of Emmanuel Church, Saltburn from 1913 till 1925 was Arch Deacon T. E. Lindsay; from photographic evidence now available to the Archive he would appear to bear a very strong resemblance to the Vicar conducting the proceedings on the corner of Windsor Road and Albion Terrace. Further information having come to the Archive indicates the electrification of the street lights (an incomplete light features in the foreground of the image) was completed by 1919, the Archive now has a postcard dating from September 1920 showing this street light completed. But the Archive would welcome comments, supporting evidence or further information.

 

Image and information courtesy of Geoff Kitching, additional information courtesy of Emmanuel Church Centenary Magazine 1967.

Mr French’s House after Fire January 11th 1908

Callum Duff has advised the Archive: “The house in your photograph is in fact, ‘Manesty’ on Marske Mill Lane. Building commenced on this house in 1905 and was originally called ‘The Homestead’ but was damaged by fire during its construction in 1906. Partly rebuilt in 1907 by Cackett and Burns Dick of Newcastle upon Tyne for Major H, R. French. The house was bought in 1919 by a Mr Hutchinson who lived in the adjacent house then called Manesty; he changed name of this house from Homestead to Manesty. ‘Manesty’ is a vernacular revival house of sandstone with ashlar dressing and is one of Saltburn’s listed buildings.

Image courtesy of Julie Tyrka and many thanks to Callum Duff for the update.