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Derailment Liverton Mines Viaduct 1909

Derailment Liverton Mines Viaduct 1909

A further image of the 1909 derailment on the Liverton Viaduct showing how the N.E.R. overcame the problems that accidents caused to its passenger timetable. Drawn up close to the head of the accident (on the Loftus side) is a commuter train.  The passengers from a Whitby-bound train can be seen walking along the trackbed, some with small children, to board the commuter train, which will then take them on the rest of their journey. Simon Chapman tells us: ”The accident occurred in 1909 and the wagons involved were fairly new. Unusually for mineral wagons they had continuous (air) brakes and were being used on trains between Liverton Mines and Cargo Fleet Works.” We understand: ”The crane appears to be a Cowans Sheldon 15-tonner. I think it’s likely to have been either CME 1 or CME 2 which were built in 1893 for the NER.”

Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers, many thanks to Simon Chapman and the Breakdown Crane Association for additional information.

Zig-Zag Train Crash

Zig-Zag Train Crash

Believed to be the result of an accident on the Skinningrove Zig Zag Line. The hopper wagon in the photo contains coke breeze, perhaps from the Skinningrove Gas Works. Date pre Great War.
Photo courtesy Pat Bennison.

Lumpsey 1930

Lumpsey 1930

This is a J39 -0-6-0 no. 1448. It was the first of a class and almost new when the incident took place, it was derailed at the trap points at Lumpsey mine near Brotton.
No I haven’t started train spotting photo. Information from Derick Pearson.

This J39 Loco was not a writeoff, it went on to be renumbered 64700 under BR ownership and remained in traffic until 1961 (based at Sunderland Shed) – it was cut up at the British Railway’s Cowlairs works in August 1961. Additional inforamtion courtesy of Ray Brown.

Lumpsey Mine 1930

Lumpsey Mine 1930

The same loco being pulled upright.
(photo courtesy of Derick Pearson)

Off the Road at Crag Hall (1993)

Off the Road at Crag Hall (1993)

A Class 37 in Railfreight livery passes what looks like a Class 31 stranded on the roads at Crag Hall, by the lean on it it looks like a broken spring. Russ Pigott tells us: ”The 31 is actually derailed. It came off on the points leading to the headshunt that are worked from the box. I was having my annual assessment at the time and so was the signalman. Also the train was an inspection saloon from York, I’ve never seen so many gaffers in one spot!  The cause was put down to poor maintainance of the point rodding and as the chief signalling engineer was in the saloon I reckon he would have got a lot of stick afterwards!”

Image and additional information courtesy of Russ Pigott.

Off the Road at Crag Hall 1993

Off the Road at Crag Hall 1993

Looks like they got it fixed – it’s now sat level on the 4 foot, running lights are on and the engineers are retiring to their carriage. (no doubt for tea and tiffin!).

(image courtesy of Russ Pigott)

Lingdale Junction No. 1

Lingdale Junction No. 1

Lingdale junction 1900, recovery engine N0. 1245, the accident on 5th November took place at the junction of two mineral branches near Brotton.  A train loaded with ironstone decending from Lingdale mines got out of control on the 1 in 6 gradient and was derailed at trap points at the junction with Kilton branch.  The engine 0-6-0 No. 1245 built at Darlington 1783, which was running tender first, at this point the line was on an embankment, when No.1245 was derailed it fell onto it’s right hand  side on the slope of the embankment.

It was recovered using two sets of block and tackle anchored to the rails on which the engine stood to keep them in place.  Two further engines were attached to the tackle and as they moved away from one another No. 1245 was pulled upright.

(image and text courtesy of Derick Pearson)

Lingdale Junction 2

Lingdale Junction 2

The second photo of the derailing at Lingdale.

(image courtesy of Derick Pearson)

Derailing at Lingdale

Derailing at Lingdale

A good engineering image this; showing the delicate job of righting a fallen locomotive using good old block and tackle!  We can’t dispute the location, mostly because the line no longer exists, but also because there’s precious little film record of the line anyway. The crane on the engineering train is a vertical boilered steam crane. Simon Chapman advises: ”The date was November 1900, the engine was no. 1248, and the driver’s name was Metcalfe! The train was descending the gradient from Lingdale Mine with 22 loaded iron ore wagons and couldn’t stop in time so ran through the headshunt and was derailed, fortunately with no injuries to the crew.”

Update information courtesy of Simon Chapman.

Turntable Accident

Turntable Accident

The N.E.R engine is an 0-6-0 type and numbered 463.
I am not sure about this but was told it was around 1910 but hope someone would confirm it.

(image courtesy of Derick Pearson)

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