Archives

Hummersea House

Entitled Hummersea House, this image is more recognisable to many as Hummersea Farmhouse. Hummersea Farm was originally built for the Manager of the Alum quarries and works, the farm house being built to the right in an ā€™Lā€™ shape layout. The photographer obviously ensure the whole family were in view when he arrived to take this image, all in their best clothes? Perhaps somebody can identify the family?

Image courtesy of a supporter of the Archive.

National Provincial Bank – Loftus

Alas no longer a bank, this building in later years and before it finally closed it was better known as the Natwest. I can remember there being a National Provincial bank, becoming the National Westminster bank and then Natwest. How the interior of the building changed would be apparent to all who used the building in later years.

Image courtesy of a supporter of the Archive.

Loftus Frozen Waterfall 1929

Obviously it was a cold winter in 1929! This postcard view give a dramatic view of the intensity of the cold weather, the waterfall appears as a solid wall of ice. Brrrr.

Image courtesy of a supporter of the Archive.

Lumley Street Loftus

Another early view of Loftus; the are of Loftus known to many of the older generation as ‘The Brickyard’; being close to the original brick production yard near the Mars Inn (originally Mars Farmhouse). The style of dress of the young lads lounging against the window of number 1, give and idea of the date.

Image courtesy of a supporter of the Archive.

Cliff Crescent Loftus

An early view of Cliff Crescent, Loftus; this view of the Crescent will be familiar to all who travel through Loftus after ascending Loftus bank. The pony and trap on the incorrect side of the road gives an idea of how light the traffic flow would be at the time this postcard view was taken.is a good start. Such an activity today, discounting the vehicles kerbside parked would be a recipe for disaster.

Image courtesy of a supporter of the Archive.

The Saltburn Cafe 6

This final image finally has some staff(?) in view, that is the assumption; with a person behind the cafe counter. Although the two ladies in the door way can also be seen in the first interior view; standing in the double doors looking out over the front steps from the corner of Spa Bank and the lower promenade. Do you know whom they are?

Image and information courtesy of Reg Wilson, additional information courtesy of Ancestry, Find My Past and Callum Brown.

The Saltburn Cafe 5

This fourth interior view (which if in the correct sequence should go between images 2 and 3), has a noticeboard which includes a poster for “The Little Theatre – Cabaret” with the opening night on July 9th. Year unknown, as yet; perhaps one of our watchers can assist? As with other pictures in this sequence, very few customers can be seen.

Image and information courtesy of Reg Wilson, additional information courtesy of Ancestry, Find My Past and Callum Brown.

The Saltburn Cafe 4

This third interior view, obviously pans further round the cafe, showing the staircase to the upper floor. The use of windsor style of chairs give an idea of the quantity of customers the cafe could cater for at any one time. I have memories of the cafe in the 1950s, when with my mother of tea and other refreshments could be purchased from the cafe and taken to the beach. The crockery was a more basic white crockery; but complete with tea pot and was always returned to the cafe after use. No throw-away paper or plastic in those days; and obviously breakages must have had to be paid for! Does any of our watchers rmember these times.

Image and information courtesy of Reg Wilson, additional information courtesy of Ancestry, Find My Past and Callum Brown.

The Saltburn Cafe 3

This view, number three in the series, is almost a reverse of the previous image; looking toward the side entance from Spa Bank. Obviously the wooden slatted chairs would be more easily stored when only the inside seating could be utilised in the event of inclement weather. Researches have revealed that by the 1939 Census Betty had married Alan Swift and moved to live in Middlesex. Reg Wilson was told by his mother: “Alan Ward was a notable cricketer”. The Archive is still researching this detail, Alan Swift in the 1939 Censu is recorded as an Assistant Solicitor;but would welcome any additional inforamtion our viewers can add.

Image and information courtesy of Reg Wilson, additional information courtesy of Ancestry, Find My Past and Callum Brown.

The Saltburn Cafe 2

The second postcard view of The Saltburn Cafe, is the first of a series of five interior views of the cafe; looking out towards the pier (complete with the then familiar shelter on the end. Reg Wilson advised “My mother could remember that the manageress at that time was a Betty Osborne.” By the time of the 1939 Census (taken at the outbreak of WWII) the occupants of the cafe (which included accommodation in the upper storey) was a Miriam Osborne (55 year old widowed mother of Betty) and others. The glass topped tables and ratan chairs are very typical of that period, as well as the patterned crockery on the tables; giving an idea of the high status the cafe may had at that time.

Image and information courtesy of Reg Wilson, additional information courtesy of Ancestry, Find My Past and Callum Brown.