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The Flask Inn

The Flask Inn

The Flask Inn, 7 miles from Whitby on the road to Scarborough is a former 18th century coaching inn . Now much altered with development and lying away from the realigned road. The opened topped sports car stands at the lone petrol pump, can any one identify the make of the car?

Image courtesy of Iris Place.

Egton Bridge and Bank

Egton Bridge and Bank

A further Judges postcard view of Egton Bridge, St Hedda’s RC church and the bank (entitled Egton Cliff on maps!) which descends from Egton, at the top of the hill. The view, dating from the 1950s; was probably taken from the road which having crossed the River Esk splits and then leads to Goathland or over the moor to Rosedale.

Image courtesy of Iris Place.

Lealholm

Lealholm

A Judges postcard view of Lealholm, dating from the 1950s. Sited at a crossing point on the River Esk, Lealholm has an long history and is recorded in the Domesday Book. It was recently described by the Sunday Times “as the prettiest village in Yorkshire”; a title it well deserves, being a popular destination for many visitors to Eskdale.

Image courtesy of Iris Place.

Aislaby Church

Aislaby Church

Dating from the 1950s this Judges postcard shows Aislaby church, it stands at the western end of the village; dedicated to St Margaret built in 1897 as a replacement  a chapel (dating from 1732) which still stands further to the east.

Image courtesy of Iris Place.

Cleveland’s Matterhorn

Cleveland's Matterhorn

A familiar view to all who visit the area is this more modern image of Roseberry Topping; viewed from the lay-by/car parking are as one approaches Newton under Roseberry. At 1,049 feet (320 m), Roseberry Topping was traditionally thought to be the highest hill on the  North York Moors however, the nearby Urra Moor is higher, at 1,490 feet (450 m). The top offers views of Captain Cook’s Monument on Easby Moor and the monument on Eston Nab. We are informed: “Until 1912 the summit resembled a sugarloaf, but a geological fault and possibly nearby alum and ironstone mining caused its collapse.”

Image courtesy of Iris Place.

More Snow at Osmotherley

More Snow at Osmotherley

A further view (again a modern reproduction of a 1950s postcard) of snow at Osmotherly. The newspaper delivery must get through; judging by the banked up roadsides there had been snow previously. I can remember similar winter scenes and life seemed to just go on. Memories of taking newspapers out: despite the delivery vans having difficulty in getting from Darlington, we were expected to be ready to deliver. And there was trouble if you were late collecting your delivery bag! Ann Jackson advises : “Queen Catherine public house in the background.”

Image courtesy of Iris Place and thanks to Ann for that update.

Winter Scene at Osmotherley

Winter Scene at Osmotherley

Despite being a modern reproduction (of a 1950s) postcard view this is how we used to have snow! This on the main street in Osmpotherly does not deter our young sledgers from enjoying an opportunity to make use of the snow.

Image courtesy of Iris Place.

Do You Remember Rosedale Chimney?

Do You Remember Rosedale Chimney?

Once a very familiar sight to all who traversed Blakey Ridge, whilst crossing the North York Moors, Bank Top chimney remained standing long after the Rosedale ironstone mines had closed, only being taken down in 1972. It was for many years a familiar landmark and indicator for the route of the Lyke Wake Walk.
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah.

 

Captain Cook’s Monument

Cpt Cook Mon-a-1

Captain Cook’s Monument was erected in 1827 by Robert Campion (a Whitby banker), it is an obelisk 60 ft (18 m) high in memory of the great British explorer and bears a plaque inscribed: ”In memory of the celebrated circumnavigator Captain James Cook F.R.S. A man of nautical knowledge inferior to none, in zeal prudence and energy, superior to most. Regardless of danger he opened an intercourse with the Friendly Isles and other parts of the Southern Hemisphere. He was born at Marton October 27th 1728 and massacred at Owythee February 14th 1779 to the inexpressible grief of his countrymen. While the art of navigation shall be cultivated among men, whilst the spirit of enterprise, commerce and philanthropy shall animate the sons of Britain, while it shall be deemed the honour of a Christian Nation to spread civilisation and the blessings of the Christian faith among pagan and savage tribes, so long will the name of Captain Cook stand out amongst the most celebrated and most admired benefactors of the human race.” A great monument to a great man.

Image courtesy of John G. Hannah.

Castleton and Danby War Memorial

Castleton and Danby War Memorial

The memorial stands in open moorland on Ainthorpe Lane, Castleton; serving as the memorial for both Castleton & Danby. This image possibly dates from the dedication of the memorial in October 1921, by Viscount Downe and Baron Dawnay.
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