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Port Mulgrave

Port Mulgrave

A Lovely photo of Port Mulgrave’s docks of years gone by.
(photo courtesy of Neil Suckling)

After The Fire

After The Fire

That’s what it says on the photo and this has been confirmed by Simon Chapman who tells us: ”This was a fire at Port Mulgrave about 1911. You can see it has burnt out the engine room and boilers for the rope haulage system through the tunnel to Dalehouse, exposing a section through one of the bunkers for loading ironstone into ships in the harbour. The big mound of ironstone to the right was usually built up when sea conditions prevented ships docking and taking normal shipments away. The damage was later repaired and the harbour got back to normal operations.”

(photo courtesy of Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum and many thanks to Simon Chapman for the supporting information)

Port Mulgrave

Port Mulgrave

The port with the boats there waiting to be loaded, how busy it is.

Grinkle Ironstone at Port Mulgrave

Grinkle Ironstone at Port Mulgrave

Now positively identified as the jetty at Port Mulgrave and is a different view of the ”Boats waiting to be loaded” also on the site. Thanks to Bill Danby for the update.

Working Plan

Working Plan

Thanks to the Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum we can show a plan of the workings of Boulby Mine.

Simon Chapman points out: ”If you read the small print at the bottom you will see that this is a plan of the workings of Boulby Mine. Grinkle Mine was to the south and much more extensive.”

Thanks to Simon for the correction.

Boulby Mine

Boulby Mine

One of the pit horses at the Boulby ironstone mine.  I believe it is by the Travelling Drift.

One of the men to be seen working behind the horse was known as Pidge.

(Image courtesy of Mr. R. Conn)

Grinkle Mine

Grinkle Mine

Not a very clear picture, but as we don’t have many of Grinkle mine we felt we had to publish it. We know the mine was abandoned in 1934, hence very little survives to this day. Has anyone got any more photos or information they would like to share with us?
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.

Grinkle Miners

Another piece of the jigsaw – this image includes the two ”trappy” lads from a previous post and the Archive originally posted this image believing it to be of miners from Loftus mine; however Simon Chapman has advised us it is the miners from Grinkle mine which was owned by Sir Mark Palmer of Grinkle Park. Interestingly it looks as if it is also part of a larger image and hopefully at some time the Archive will find the complete picture, in the mean time can anybody name any of these people?

With thanks to Simon Chapman for the correction.

“Trappy” Lads

Now known to be part of the workforce of the Boulby and Grinkle mines, Trappy Lads were present in all mines. This was the job you got when you left school in the pit villages of the North-East – these lads look about 14 – their job was to open and close the ventilation doors as the horses and tubs came through.  They’re possibly wearing ”miner’s heels” which were an attachment to the workers boots of the time – you knew you’d been kicked if you got a ding from these! – the lads are carrying Tinplate ”midges” by the look of them, they used candles in the earlier days, later carbide powered midges were used.  Part of a larger group image, which can be viewed later in the Archive.

Dale House to Port Mulgrave Tunnel Entrance

An image of the unique cableless locomotives used by The Grinkle Mine of Sir Charles Mark Palmer to negotiate the low headroom in the tunnels on the route from Grinkle to Port Mulgrave. In the background is the entrance to the Port Mulgrave Tunnel, where the wagons were transferred to the dock at Port Mulgrave using a main and tail rope system powered from an engine-house on the Port Mulgrave side. A real bit of industrial history!

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