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South Town Lane

South Town Lane

The Lane leading down to south Loftus. the road looks in terrible condition, Surprising, because looking at the view of Skinningrove Works in the distance we can see NO 5 Furnace, built in 1951. At this date was Loftus Urban District Council, or North Riding council responsible for Roads ?.

Dam Street

Dam Street

This view of Dam street, Before the beck was channelled, And still prone to flooding at the present day,
It Shows the old Loftus Police Station, in the centre of the photo. in 1891, the Police Inspector was Thomas Allen,
and George E Nawton, was a Constable, who boarded at the Station

Market Place Loftus

Market Place Loftus

The South Side of the market place, Sometime in the 1950’s
Covells Butchers delivery van awaits its load, they delivered around the district. The United Bus waits at the stop, Teeside bound. The solitary figure looks at the cinema poster. The Regal is advertising RENDEZVOUS, Which is a clue for dating.
The Town Hall Clock is Showing twenty past ten a.m. But the Market Place is Remarkedly Quiet.
Friths Postcard, courtesy of Rita Unthank.

Zetland Road

Zetland Road

A quiet sunny day in Loftus, the awnings are down to protect the shop windows from the sun. Not a lot of people out shopping and not much traffic.
Image courtesy of Rita Unthank.

Beware the Lion

Beware the Lion

This photo, Dates from just before the second world
war. The newly opened Regal Cinema stands next to the Golden lion Hotel, With it’s Lion statue gazing down on the market place. It’s replacement is a poor copy of the original. The bus experts will tell us about the make and model standing at the stop.
Image courtesy of Rita Unthank.

Loftus – an aerial view

Loftus - an aerial view

An aerial view of Loftus taken as part of the works to rectify the slippage on Loftus bank,

Image courtesy of Keith Ferry

Work Begins

Work Begins

After Specialist Work by Rock climbers on the steep cliff face of the narrows. Work begins on Removing 20,000 Tons of unstable ground, And replacing it with 200,000 tons of Fill, Using excavations from the Skelton and Brotton Bypass then under construction. This occupied the rest of 1999. At first Weight restrictions and traffic lights were used, But when the Bank closed, an 15 mile Diversion was in force, Onto the N. York Moors A171 Road.
Image courtesy Keith Ferry.
I

Work in Progress

Work in Progress

Loftus Bank, This Montage of Photos Shows the Construction of the Culvert to Channel Whitecliffe Beck. Past the Landslip. It was 173 Metres Long, With the Tunnel for the Sewer 140 Metres long. At the Top of the Bank the existing road was removed and replaced, and a retaining wall 65 Metres long and4 Metres high constructed. It was one of the biggest engineering projects ever undertaken by Redcar and Cleveland council.  During the Works, Road traffic was routed onto the N. York Moors A171 Road.  A 15 Mile detour to Teeside. At a cost of 3 Million Pounds, The road finally opened to controversy on September 29th 2000. Some Nineteen Months after the first slip.
Image courtesy Keith Ferry.

Aftermath

Aftermath

The devastation after the massive landslide, on Mill Bank Loftus, February 1999.
Image courtesy Keith Ferris.

Whitecliffe Beck

Whitecliffe Beck

Whitecliffe Wood, Loftus. Before the landslip, in 1999.
Image courtesy Keith Ferry.