Recent Comments

Archives

Recent Comments

Archives

Ugthorpe- West End

A delightful view of the west end of Ugthorpe, from a Tom Watson postcard, dated 1904. John Gallon tells the Archive: “Looking east, Pump Farm in the foreground, the “Pump” is over the wall behind the open farmyard gate, I was told that when I was a toddler I almost fell down the well looking for a lost kitten very soon after it was filled in (someone must have cared about me!!! Rose Cottage is in the middle distance (red brick). The “tin” hut in the centre was known as the Postman’s Hut where the postman would sort the post before delivering, it was wood lined inside and later used as a coal shed for the farm. As I write this I am sat, indoors, very close to where the dead tree is standing.”

Image courtesy of Beryl Morris, thanks to John Gallon for the detail and update.

Commondale School

Commondale School

A lovely Tom Watson postcard view of all the children outside Commondale School for this photograph; it would seem a lot of children for such a small village; but there was a thriving brickworks in the valley in the late 19th and early 20th century. What date do you think it was taken.

A lovely Tom Watson postcard loaned to us by Tina Dowey.

The Ford

The ford at Hutton-le-Hole; I know it’s a quite a way from East Cleveland but we do have some lovely postcards of the North Yorkshire Moors and this is not as you would see Hutton-le-Hole today. Taken about 1900 and believed to be a Tom Watson postcard.

Image courtesy of Tina Dowey.

Ralphs Cross

Ralphs Cross

A well-known landmark on the North Yorkshire Moors. Many years ago if you passed this you would put a penny on the top for the travellers or tramps to take as they went past. This and other crosses on the moors were erected as markers for the monks as they travelled the moor from abbey to abbey.

Image courtesy of Tina Dowey.

Glaisdale

A view of Glaisdale, but not as we know it! This postcard is dated 29th. January 1872. Eric Johnson tells us: ”an interesting view of the short-lived Glaisdale Ironworks. Three blast furnaces with barrow hoist can be seen, moving left the blast engine house with boiler chimney, then the trestle bridge of the mineral railway which ran up Glaisdale Rigg to ironstone quarries. The smaller chimney was part of the shaft sunk to the small seam. Like the Runswick Bay Ironworks was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

The ill-fated ”Paddy Waddell’s Railway” more properly known as The Cleveland Mineral Extension Railway was originally intended to join this Ironworks at Glaisdale to the Teesside furnaces, the rest is history.

Image courtesy of Olive Bennett & Joyce Dobson and thanks to Eric Johnson for the update.

Beggars Bridge

Yes I know we have photographs of this bridge but you must admit this one is rather lovely.
Image courtesy of Keith Bowers.

Commondale

Commondale

Commondale Brick and Pipe Works can be seen on the left in this view of the village.  The card was posted in 1907 and at that time the brickworks were owned and managed by the Crossleys.  A railway track connected the works to the main line from Battersby, making it easy for the bricks to be exported to London and all parts of the country.

Image courtesy of Tina Dowey and information from ”Commondale, The story of a North Yorkshire Village” by Vera Robinson.

The Esk in Flood

The Esk in Flood

1903 saw some of the heaviest rainfalls throughout the United Kingdom, June being described as the wettest on record; with long periods of sustained rainfall. This image of the Esk in flood in 1903, produced by W.H.Earl of Commondale; being a typical example. This view has been taken from above Castleton station.

Image courtesy of Tina Dowey.

Duck’s Bridge Danby

It says ”Duck’s Bridge” on this postcard by Tom Watson, Lythe, of the old packhorse bridge near Danby.  We know it as Duck Bridge.

Image courtesy of Tina Dowey.

Lealholm

A postcard view of Lealholm taken about a hundred years ago.  The village has been added to over the years, but the stepping stones, chapel and the farms are still there.

Image courtesy of Tina Dowey.