Recent Comments

Archives

Recent Comments

Archives

Captain Cook’s Monument

Cpt Cook Mon-a-1

Captain Cook’s Monument was erected in 1827 by Robert Campion (a Whitby banker), it is an obelisk 60 ft (18 m) high in memory of the great British explorer and bears a plaque inscribed: ”In memory of the celebrated circumnavigator Captain James Cook F.R.S. A man of nautical knowledge inferior to none, in zeal prudence and energy, superior to most. Regardless of danger he opened an intercourse with the Friendly Isles and other parts of the Southern Hemisphere. He was born at Marton October 27th 1728 and massacred at Owythee February 14th 1779 to the inexpressible grief of his countrymen. While the art of navigation shall be cultivated among men, whilst the spirit of enterprise, commerce and philanthropy shall animate the sons of Britain, while it shall be deemed the honour of a Christian Nation to spread civilisation and the blessings of the Christian faith among pagan and savage tribes, so long will the name of Captain Cook stand out amongst the most celebrated and most admired benefactors of the human race.” A great monument to a great man.

Image courtesy of John G. Hannah.

Castleton and Danby War Memorial

The memorial stands in open moorland on Ainthorpe Lane, Castleton; serving as the memorial for both Castleton & Danby. This image possibly dates from the dedication of the memorial in October 1921, by Viscount Downe and Baron Dawnay.

Beckhole

This postcard view of Beckhole – which grew up round an old fording point of the Murk Esk – in Victorian times was much visited having extensive orchards with visitors enjoying the many walks and waterfalls; as well as taking tea beneath the apple trees.
Image courtesy of John G Hannah.

Danby Castle

A hand tinted postcard view of Danby Castle by Tom Watson of Lythe; although when viewed from the road more resembles a fortified farmhouse! It dates from the early 14th century and was built by Baron le Latimer. It was visited by King Edward II in 1323, Danby Castle; it was and still is a popular postcard theme.
Image courtesy of John G Hannah.

Lealholm

A delightful view of Lealholm, from a Tom Watson postcard, dating from 1905. A wonderful peaceful scene.
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah.

Glaisdale Post Office

An early postcard view; obviously hand tinted! Dating from about 1905 of the Post Office at Glaisdale. In modern day Glaisdale, the house with the mock Tudor ridge ends still looks over the green at the side of Glaisdale High Street. But I would not recommend pushing the pram along the road in the same way.
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah

Old Bridge at Great Ayton

Old Bridge at Great Ayton

The title of this postcard view of the bridge in Great Ayton is apt, the bridge in the image is remarkably similar tot the present day bridge, being rebuilt in 1909. The only difference being in the base of the central supporting pillar. Today you are unlikely to see people in smock tops beside the stream!
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah

Isolated at Sleights

Isolated at Sleights

A Yorkshire Post image of the River Esk in flood at Sleights. On 23rd July 1930 severe flooding affected Sleights following a cloud burst. Many villagers were marooned in their homes, surrounded by water as our postcard picture shows. These floods, the worst since the 1800’s affected the whole of the Esk valley. Obviously the Yorkshire Post had a photographer available at the right moment. Pity this poor householder!
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah

Saltersgate on the Moors

Although postmarked from 1952, it is likely this postcard view of Saltersgate and across what is known as Fylingdales moor is possibly pre 1940; not a lot to see apart from sheep!
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah

Saltersgate on the Moors

Although postmarked from 1952, it is likely this postcard view of Saltersgate and across what is known as Fylingdales moor is possibly pre 1940; not a lot to see apart from sheep! Graham Denison tells us: “You can see the Saltersgate Pub, bottom of the bank on the left. Legend says ‘The fire is never to be allowed to go out or the excise man who is supposedly buried underneath it will start haunting the neighbourhood’. Pub closed and boarded up, guess the fire’s out too!”. By 2019 even the pub has gone now!!

Image courtesy of John G. Hannah and thanks to Graham Denison for the update.