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Loftus Hall

Loftus Hall; built in the the area now known as Hall Grounds, Loftus. Around 1840 Sir Robert Dundas decided to build a new hall and enclosed a piece of land stretching from the bottom to the top of Church Bank, along the High Street veering to the left of Jasmine Cottage and then back to the woods almost as far as the mill, effectively cutting off Liverton Road, which ran down behind the present library. The route to Liverton was re-sited on Station Road.. Apart from being a local landowner, Sir Robert Dundas was also proprietor of the Lofthouse Alum Works. Peter Appleton has advised: “Sir Robert Lawrence Dundas (1780-1844) inherited the manor of Loftus from his father, Sir Thomas Dundas (1741-1820). By 1829, he had moved his home to Upleatham Hall. His land agent for the manor of Loftus then had use of Loftus Hall as their home. Communication between Sir Robert and his agent was carried out through a memo book system. Sir Robert would write his questions on one page and the agent would place his answers on the opposite page, followed by any requests. On his next visit, Sir Robert would respond to the agent’s requests and then add his own questions, and so it went on. At least one of these memo books has survived and is in the archives at Northallerton. A brief perusal of it indicated that Sir Robert visited Loftus approximately once a week, sometimes more frequently. When Sir Robert Lawrence Dundas died, he passed his manor of Loftus to his nephew, Sir Thomas Dundas (1795-1893), son of his elder brother Sir Lawrence Dundas (1766-1839).”

Image courtesy of Alan Richardson, additional information courtesy of Jean Wiggins; thanks also to Peter Appleton for the update on the Dundas family.

1 comment to Loftus Hall

  • Sir Robert Lawrence Dundas (1780-1844) inherited the manor of Loftus from his father, Sir Thomas Dundas (1741-1820). By 1829, he had moved his home to Upleatham Hall. His land agent for the manor of Loftus then had use of Loftus Hall as their home. Communication between Sir Robert and his agent was carried out through a memo book system. Sir Robert would write his questions on one page and the agent would place his answers on the opposite page, followed by any requests. On his next visit, Sir Robert would respond to the agent’s requests and then add his own questions, and so it went on. At least one of these memo books has survived and is in the archives at Northallerton. A brief perusal of it indicated that Sir Robert visited Loftus approximately once a week, sometimes more frequently. When Sir Robert Lawrence Dundas died, he passed his manor of Loftus to his nephew, Sir Thomas Dundas (1795-1893), son of his elder brother Sir Lawrence Dundas (1766-1839).

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