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The Literary Institute on Skelton High Street

Originally known as the Skelton Literary Institute, this building stood on the corner across from what used to be Kingston’s Chemists and is the area currently being refurbished from the rough car park that has occupied the site for many years.  Opened on 4th November 1899; Bill Danby in ‘History of Skelton In Cleveland’ tells us: “The £2,000 cost was paid for by the Whartons of Skelton Castle.”; as well as much interesting information about the management committee and the control of the building. The building was demolished in January 1994. Judy Last tells us: “My grandfather, Albert Tuck, was Postmaster and ran the General Stores in Vaughan Street, North Skelton in the late 1890s after taking over the family business from his father, Edwin Tuck (who had been running the Grocers shop in Boosbeck since the late 1870s). At one time Albert was in partnership with his brother-in-law, John Thompson and the Stores was called Tuck & Thompson at that time. My father, Alexander Tuck, who was born above the Stores in 1897 often told me of watching the Magic Lantern slide shows at I believe the Institute in Skelton, and I would think that the Literary Institute would be the place he was talking about.”

Image courtesy of Julie Tyrka, additional information courtesy of Bill Danby and the Skelton In History Website. Thanks to Peter Appleton for the correct demolition date and to Judy Last for her update.

2 comments to The Literary Institute on Skelton High Street

  • Peter Appleton

    The building was actually demolished in January 1994 – much later than you previously thought.

  • Judy Last

    My grandfather, Albert Tuck, was Postmaster and ran the General Stores in Vaughan Street, North Skelton in the late 1890s after taking over the family business from his father, Edwin Tuck, (who had been running the Grocers shop in Boosbeck since the late 1870s). At one time Albert was in partnership with his brother-in-law, John Thompson and the Stores was called Tuck & Thompson at that time. My father, Alexander Tuck,, who was born above the Stores in 1897 often told me of watching the Magic Lantern slide shows at I believe the Institute in Skelton, and I would think that the Literary Institute would be the place he was talking about.

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