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Aerial View Loftus

Taken from the east, in the foreground is the roof of the Chapel then along Arlington Street, we see on the right the road to Spring Head and on the left Dam End, the road widens at the Market Place. The road on the right of the photo is the road that leads up to Micklow lane. A lovely clear postcard view believed to have been sold by Ford’s in the early 1960’s, although unsure of date of production. However Norman Patton points out: ”I suspect that the church in the foreground is the Newton Memorial Chapel which was damaged beyond repair in the bombing of 1941 and demolished.  It also appears that the beautiful and large Methodist Chapel near to the Arlington Hotel had not been built when this photograph was taken and yet I remember attending in my earliest days (early 40s)!!  There is an obelisk at the east end of the market square which I don’t remember seeing in my life and I am not convinced that the War Memorial is in the picture.  I don’t know how many of these observations are accurate but given the number of what appear to be motor vehicles on the road,  I am guessing about 1920………don’t forget the aeroplane!?” Richard Watson comments: ”Would concur with Norman’s observations — the houses now opposite the recreation ground on Micklow Lane also are absent — the 20′s would seem a good guess.”
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah and thanks to Norman & Richard for the updates.

A Different View

Another lovely aerial view showing a different part of Loftus, any places you recognise?
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah and Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum.

Greetings from Loftus

Greetings from Loftus

This collection of views of Loftus and district was produced by Skilbeck’s Printing, Bookbinding and Stationery Works, Loftus. The Liverton Mines picture, top right, threw me at first. It’s a view up the main road with Cliff Terrace on the right, long before the other houses on Liverton Road were built.

Image courtesy of Beryl Morris.

Loftus Wood

Loftus Wood

The title says ”Loftus Wood” and the team were unsure of the location, but now Rick King tells us: ”The waterfall is between the old foundry and the wooden bridge down near the viaduct, probably half a kilometer upstream. be careful when walking upstream because the cliffs narrow in over the beck.”

Image courtesy of Beryl Morris and thanks to Rick for the update on location of this delightful scene.

Loftus from the Air c.1935

An Aerofilms series postcard view of what was then Loftus Senior School (later Loftus Junior School and presently unused) as well as West Road and beyond. Note the allotment gardens where Coronation Park is now, as well as the absence of any housing on what is now Coronation Road.

Image courtesy of Joyce Hore and the Mining Museum

Road to North Terrace

Road to North Terrace

Joe Ward  brought us this set of snaps that were taken in the winter of 1962/3.  He was working for the Council as a painter and decorator but the weather was so bad there was nothing else to do and they were set on snow-clearing.  In this picture Joe and casual labourers are digging out the lane to North Terace. We have a comment from Dorothy Marsay: ”the gentleman at the back right of the photo could be Frank Dale and it could be Doreen Cooke at the front.” 

Thanks to Ray Tough for that update.

Deep Drifts

Deep Drifts

This is Charlie Bibby standing on the snow drifts beside Hummersea Lane.

Digging Out

Digging Out

Percy Simpson was driving the tractor, clearing the snow on the lane above Spring House Farm.  I think that it’s Micklow Cottages and Street Houses that can be seen in the background.  When were Micklow Cottages demolished?

Thanks to Joe Ward for this set of photos and information.

Espiners Wood

Espiners Wood

Thanks to Beryl Morris for this postcard view of the wood taken from down beside the beck.

Which Bridge?

Which Bridge?

”Haugh Bridge, Water Lane” is written on the back of this card, but we don’t think it is. Could it be the footbridge at the bottom of Slater’s Banks, taken from the field? The ’Private Wood’ was felled and cleared round about 1970 and has since regrown.