Archives

Charles Hall’s Wedding

This photograph arrived to the Archive already titled, however the whole story was revealed following three contacts from George Tremain. He told the Archive:”The older Charles Hall was my great, great grandfather and Margaret Elizabeth my great, great grandmother”. George then assisted with: “This photograph shows the wedding between Charles Hall of Front Street, Carlin How to Olive Appleby; also of Carlin How. They were my great grand parents. The wedding took place in 1920, Charles was 30 years of age and Olive was also 30 years. Also on the left of the photograph is his father Charles Hall who had been an Overman in the Loftus Ironstone Mine who was aged 76 years at the time of the photograph and his wife Margaret Elizabeth Ann (nee Ord). The parents of the bride were William and Mary Appleby.” George added even more information about the Hall family with: “An ancestor of mine called Charles Hall married Margaret Elizabeth Ord on 18th June 1870 at Brotton Parish Church. He was an ironstone miner who later became an Overman at the Loftus Ironstone mine. He lived in 2 Carlin How lodge and later at 6 Overman’s Cottages. He had a son also called Charles Hall born in 1887 so it could possibly be his marriage if not his father’s”. Tony Nicholson also advises: “If I’m not mistaken, the chap standing at the back with the impressive moustache is Tom Petty. He and my grandfather, Fred Nicholson. set up in business together (Nicholson & Petty), first in Carlin How and then Brotton. By the look of it, Tom may well have been best man at Charles’s wedding. It certainly fits, because my grandfather was brother-in-law to Charles. They were all chapel people and this shows them standing outside Zion Chapel, Carlin How”.

Image courtesy of Carlin How Community Centre, thanks to George Tremain for confirmatory information on Charles Hall and the family; also thanks to Tony Nicholson fro the update.

Harry and Rita Sylvester’s Wedding 1932

The bride was Rita Webster, born in 1909; her parents were Thomas and Jane Ann (nee Eggleston) Webster. The groom was Harry Sylvester; Rita and Harry ran the off-license shop in Carlin How for many years, Harry was also involved with Saltburn Motor Services or ‘Pickerings’ as they were often called.

Image from a collection compiled by Derick Pearson, who also supplied some information.

Harry Raysons Wedding 1917

The title told us it was Harry Rayson’s wedding, Kate Webster was his bride and  the wedding was in 1917.  We asked ”But where was the wedding?”, Sheila Drinkhall advised that it was at Brotton; further researches have shown that Kate was the eldest daughter of Thomas Webster, Confectioner of Front Street, Carlin How. Harry is wearing the uniform of a Bombardier in the Royal Garrison Artillery (part of the Royal Field Artillery).

Many thanks to both Nivard Ovington and Sheila Drinkhall for their assistance in our researches.

Stan Ward’s Wedding

Stan Ward very well-known not only in Carlin How but the surrounding area too as the  painter and decorator, his bride was Eileen Reed and we can see one of the bridesmaids is named but who are the others in the photograph, can anyone out there help?

Image from a collection compiled by Derick Pearson.

Another Wedding

This time it’s Ronnie Patton and Louis McGuire, I am sure most older Loftus people can pick out Betty McGuire, second right, cheeriest postwoman ever.  ”Tie-Pin Ted” is also in the photograph, who I am told was one of four Winspear brothers who lived at Liverton Mines. Louis’s father stands next to her and her cousin Beatrice, next to him. Two of the lovely small bridesmaids were Rosalie and Margaret Patton.

Wesleyan Wedding 1938

It’s thanks to Norman Patton Jnr. for this photograph of his parents’ wedding taken outside the Wesleyan Chapel (Newton Memorial Chapel), Loftus in 1938. The bride was Elizabeth Hicks from East Loftus, her parents and two sisters are also in the photograph. The groom, from the ‘Brickyard’, Mr Norman Patton Snr.  is accompanied by his parents and his brother Alan. This is the only photograph we have of a ceremony outside or inside the chapel, unless anyone out there can let us have any more.

Image courtesy of Norman Patton.