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Deepdale Road

Deepdale Road

Deepdale Road, built on the side of the shale heap from Loftus down to Skinningrove. The mine is to the left in thevValley; the works on the hill and
the chimney of the Gasworks in the centre of this image.

Photo courtesy of Ken Loughran.

Bleak Outlook

Bleak Outlook

Skinningrove, with Marine Terrace basking in the snow!.
Photo courtesy Ken Loughran.

Timms Coffee House

 Timms Coffee House

Timms Coffee House, Skinningrove. A grade 2 listed building, built as Skinningrove Hall in 1704 to replace the Old Hall of the 1500s (now the Post Office) for the Easterby family. The Maynard family developed it as a hotel in the 1800s and named it Timms Coffee House after the coffee houses then popular in London. Karen Houdek tells us: ”The family owners leased the building to Martha Allinson, who transferred her ale license for the Buck Inn to the Skinningrove Hall building in 1875.  She and her husband George were proprietors of Timm’s Coffee House and Public House, in a different building in the 1861 census.  By the 1871 census their business was called the Buck’s Hotel. Martha ran the business solely when George died in 1872.  In September of 1875 her application to Magistrates to transfer her license from the Buck Inn to Skinningrove Old Hall was granted. The business was turned over to Martha and George’s son John sometime b/t the 1881 census and 1890, as listed in the 1890 Kelly’s Directory. Per the 1891 census Martha has moved to Linthorpe, Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire with her son William, and eventually dies in Middlesbrough in 1908. (An interesting little tidbit about the ties of the two families is found in the 1871 census, in which Martha and George’s daughter Margaret was employed as a servant for the Maynard family.)  John dies in April of 1890, and his wife Sarah runs the establishment until her death in August of 1901. The 1911 census shows George Hall as the proprietor.  The Halls are loosely connected to the Allinsons through marriage, with David Hall (George’s uncle), b. 1852 being married to John Allinson’s sister Ann Elizabeth, b. 1851.” Jill Wheatley tells us ” My gran and grandad – John (Jack) Shepherd – used to own Timms fro  1959 to 1975.”
Photograph taken in June 1964 by Ken Loughran, many thanks to Karen, Jill and Joanne for the updates.

Skinningrove Village

Skinningrove Village

A pre Great War postcard view of Skinningrove Valley. The Miner’s Hospital is prominent at the bottom right.

Postcard courtesy Alan Richardson.

The Grove

The "Grove"

Taken from the path down to the ”Grove”, the bridge over the beck leads to the Gas showroom. Number 5 furnace dominates the skyline in this photo of around 1960.

Photo courtesy of Ken Loughran.

Beck Bridge

Skinningrove in 1960’s; the railway bridge over the beck still stands but the track rails have been removed prior to demolition. The Archive asked “Can any one help with the date of their removal”. Thomas Sayers has told the Archive: ”I have a photocopy of the whole of the bottom of the zig zag showing full details of all 13 sidings in yards, length and standage and in the bottom left is  handwritten; “All sidings & RL removed 195? I have cut off the final figure on the photocopier at the NTM in York. I would estimate the final figure to be either 8 or 9”. Colin Hart advises: “The two arches one over the road, the other over the beck were removed around 1970, after this the new houses on Angling Green were built. My Grandparents lived at the bottom house on Grove Hill and we spent many hours playing in the old coal bunkers”.

Image courtesy of Ken Loughran; also thanks to Thomas Sayers and Colin Hart for the updates.

Skinningrove Valley

Skinningrove Valley

Skinningrove valley and ironworks about 1920. The houses surrounded by industrial pollution from the works , a column of escaping gas can be seen rising from the coke ovens as a retort is emptied. Below in the valley the gas works with a rail tanker on the siding collecting tar produced at the plant. All in contrast with the well kept and tended allotments on the valley sides; at the top left St Helen’s Church completing the scene.

Photograph courtesy Alan Richardson

Skinningrove Jetty & Huntcliff

Skinningrove Jetty & Huntcliff

Photograph taken at low tide, the steep ’Bothroyd’s Bank’ leads down to Skinningrove beach. The jetty is exposed to its full length, with ships for loading pig iron would stand off,  waiting for high tide; on the beach  can be seen some horses -purpose unknown – and two people tend plants in the field on the left.

Photograph courtesy Alan Richardson.

Pipe end at Skinningrove

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Even 60 years ago it looked the same. I can remember first seeing this strange point in the sea and wondering what it was for?

Image courtesy of Ken Loughran

Reflection in Rock Pool

Reflection in Rock Pool

Taken from the Hummersea side of Skinningrove Beach, the works with No.5 furnace reflected in the pool from the afternoon sun.

Photo courtesy of Ken Loughran.