Recent Comments

Archives

Kilts

Kilts

Scottish soldiers trudge through the ever-present mud, carrying bedding perhaps on the way to a rear rest area. The Germans called Scottish soldiers ”The Ladies from Hell”.

Vickers

Vickers

King of the battlefield; a Vickers machine gun, along with the German Maschinengewehr 08, which caused some 90% of the 60,000 British casualties. On the first day of the Battle of the Somme in 1916, the crews were given short thrift when captured. This machine gun has been mounted on a motorcycle side car to give greater mobility.

Passchendaele

Passchendaele

British ”Tommies” struggle through the cloying mud with an injured comrade, gas respirators are prominent on their chests. Soldiers ironically called this Third Battle of Ypres ”Passiondale or Passchendaele”

Desolation

Desolation

The desolation in this photo, was repeated on every battlefield in France, it could have been taken almost anywhere. The size of the crater was probably the result of a mine explosion.

His Majesty’s Landships

His Majesty's Landships

A concept of First Lord of the Admiralty; Winston Churchill, the first tanks were called His Majesty’s Landships. Perhaps a hint to the enemy so they were given a code name reflecting their shape and became known as ”Tanks”
The rear tank in the photo appears to be a ”female”; ”male” tanks were armed with 6 pounder guns and ”females” with machine guns. Each tank carries a ditching ”beam” in case of bogging down in trenches or shell craters. On a sombre note the tanks pass a German casualty  ignored at the side of the road.

Manpower

Manpower

Human horsepower moves this large howitzer somewhere in France. The narrow gauge railway over which the gun is moving, may have been too much for the small locomotive.

The Locker Brothers?

The Locker Brothers?

A studio photo of two young soldiers, believed to be Robert and Richard Locker (standing) 4th Yorkshire Regiment. Both lived at 4 High Row, Loftus and are listed on the Loftus cenotaph. Another brother Thomas served and survived the war. From the cap badge the seated soldier is a member of the Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howard), the standing being a member of the 4th Regiment (West Yorkshire). Can anybody assist with a positive identification?
Image courtesy of a friend of the ECIA.

Peace Celebrations Loftus two

Peace Celebrations Loftus two

The parade led by the band, marches past the monumental masons on Zetland Road. The masons in France would be kept busy for many years.
A George Skilbeck photo courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers.

Peace Celebrations Loftus one

Peace Celebrations Loftus one

Many of the women in these two George Skilbeck photos of the parade to mark the Armistice, would have little to celebrate. The event for some would be tinged with sadness.
Images courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers.

Mudlarks

Mudlarks

A group of British Tommies pose in the mud of Flanders, Not to be
recommended, one of the most common afflications of life in the trenches was Trench Foot a disabling disease from the wet conditions.