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Picking Belt

Picking Belt

A typical scene on the picking belt at an ironstone mine in Cleveland. Here the shale was seperated from the ironstone as it came from the mine, larger lumps are being broken up by sledge hammers. Bill Danby tells us: ”My brother in law, Frank Holmes, who was a Deputy at both Lingdale and North Skelton Ironstone Mines says that this photograph is most likely Lingdale. North Skelton did not have a “belt”, as there so little shale content in the ore extracted from that mine, whereas at Lingdale the shale content was high. Hence the man-made mountain that used to stand behind Coral Street. South Skelton Mine, he adds, also had a “belt” but it was on a slope.”
Photo courtesy of George Pearson and many thanks to Bill (and Frank) for the update.

Port Mulgrave

A lovely photograph of Port Mulgrave’s docks; when it actually was a port, built around 1856-57, it was a very busy place serving the surrounding mines. This shows the harbour prior to World War II, the disintegrating remains of Palmers ironstone loading staithes clearly visible; the seaward pier was blown up during the war.
Image courtesy of Maurice Grayson, Neil Suckling and Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum.

New Belmont Mine, Guisborough

New Belmont Mine, Guisborough

We thought this was Chaloner Mine, but we have since been advised by David Richardson: ”This is the workshops and stables belonging to new Belmont Mine near Hunter Hill Farm south of Guisborough.

At Belmont Bank 500 metres east of this site was the original Belmont Mine, the ironstone seam there outcropped close to the foot of the bank but was found to rise to the west so by the time the mine was behind Hunter Hill farm its well over half way to the top of the bank.

The drift for New Belmont mine is still visible off the right of this photo and was constructed of concrete, unlike the drifts at old Belmont which were driven straight into the ironstone seam this drift is in fact an underground incline which climbs up the hill to reach the seam but arrives there some distance into the mine on one of its main roadways allowing new stone to be worked beyond the old workings south of Highcliff Nab.”
Image courtesy George Pearson and thanks to David for his clearing up our query, also to Dave Woods for his advice.

Lingdale 1962

Lingdale 1962

Photo taken from the tub side; of a ”Cranner”, about to tip the stone into the tub.
Image courtesy George Pearson.

Loader and Operator

Loader and Operator

An excellent view of a Loaderman and his Eimco Mechanical Machine called a “Cranner”, in Cleveland.The bucket picks up the Stone and Tips it into the Tub behind the Cranner. Thanks go to George Pearson for the loan of this photo taken in November 1958

Arches 15th June 1959

Arches 15th June 1959

Showing The Working Face, in Lingdale mine, Holes for the Explosives have been drilled ready for shotfiring. The roof of the place is being supported by Steel Mine Arches, joined together by Fishplates. Both Arches and Fishplates were Rolled in the 18 inch mill at Skinningrove Works.
Image courtesy George Pearson.

Morrison’s Mine, Brotton

Morrison’s Mine

A view of Morrison’s Mine and Coach Road, Brotton. Morrison’s was an independently owned mine; output was at the requirements of the Ironmasters – so could be a little or a lot depending upon demand – so called as it was developed by Robert Morrison (he lived in The Grange, Brotton), imagine having this in your back yard? There was also a brickworks! The shafts were named after Robert Morrison’s wife (Florence) and  his daughter (Mary). The overhead gantry was situated about where the children’s play area is on Coach Road today, but there are effectively no remains to indicate this industrial past.
Image courtesy George Pearson.

Lingdale mine 30th January 1957

Lingdale mine 30th January 1957

The effects of a roof fall in Lingdale Mine; the bent and twisted steel mine arches, are evident. The use of wooden pit props seem to be used to stabilise the roof.
Image courtesy George Pearson.

Kilton Mine

Kilton Mine

A view of Kilton Mine it seems strange to compare this busy scene with the present day site, which with the sole surving ironstone shale tip in the district and a couple of derelict buildings, appears almost ghostlike today.

Image courtesy of George Pearson (via Jeff Templeman)

Lingdale Mine and Brick Kiln

Lingdale Mine and Brick Kiln

A good image of the engine house at Lingdale mine. The round brick kiln on the right was part of an attempt to make the mine profitable, using shale from the tip (especially during slack times). It wasn’t particularly successful, but probably contributed enough to prevent total closure of the mine. Lingdale mine was one of the deepest mines in the Cleveland system and also had the poorest yield, there being a large band of shale splitting the seam in two. This resulted in the huge shale heap which took forever to dispose of! Lingdale village was described as almost derelict in the late Victorian era, the difficulty of winning the stone meaning that the mine was closed more often than in production.
Image courtesy Maurice Grayson.