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Bank Top Terminus – Rosedale West

Bank Top Terminus - Rosedale West

North Eastern Railway Terminus 1,000 feet above sea level and that is as much as I know about it and I read that off the caption. Now believed to be on the Rosedale end of the Rosedale to Ingleby Greenhow railway system. Thanks to Mark T for the update.

Rodney Begg tells us: ”Scarborough Archeological Publication “Research Report No. 9″ on the Rosedale Mines and Railway: “West Rosedale Bank Top, circa 1911.  Engine shed on left and railway cottages on right. Snow-ploughs on siding with traces of other sidings formerly extending to calcining kilns.” The cottages still exist and were inhabited last time I visited the area (some while back now).  A good way to get to this area and enjoy a walk as well is to join the track bed across the road from The Lion Inn on Blakey Ridge and turn right. Follow the track bed and eventually you will end up at this; the terminus at West Rosedale. On the way you will visit the site of Sheriff’s Pit, the only shaft mine in this system.”

Image courtesy of Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum and thanks to Rodney Begg for the update)

Rosedale Works

Rosedale Works

A busy day at Rosedale works I am informed thst the west works started in 1857 and the east side in 1859. Simon Chapman provides us with the following: ”This is a view of the Rosedale East Mines in the 1920s. Central in the picture is a chute for loading ironstone direct into railway wagons, while in the background, behind the white hut, a gantry spans the railway; this was the apparatus for recovering the calcine dust from below the iron-fronted or New Kilns. The wagons in the foreground are empty tubs from out of the pit.
Right in the background, behind the ramshackle tipping huts, can be seen the cottages and workshops at High Baring.
The Rosedale West Mines opened in the mid-1850s and the East Mines about 1865.”
(photo courtesy of Cleveland ironstone mining museum and grateful thanks to Simon for the dating information)

Port Mulgrave

Port Mulgrave

When it actually was a port, built around 1856-57, it was a very busy place serving the surrounding mines.

(photo courtesy of Cleveland ironstone mining museum)

Cragg Hall 1972

Cragg Hall 1972

14 years on and quite a few differences from the previous photo of Cragg Hall, judging by Russell Pigott’s comment: ”Its a lot later than 1972 I reckon summer 1987, If you blow the picture up it seems to be me in the secondman’s seat! We got the 20s late 1986 if remember right and I did my driver training in 1988. It may not be me in the picture so it could date it as late as 1990”

Many thnaks to Russ Pigott for the probable date of the image.

Cragg Hall 1958

Cragg Hall 1958

Russell Piggot ha s assisted in identifying the train as:

”A Q6 Class 6 0-8-0.”

Thanks to Russell for the update.

Dismantling Sidings

Dismantling Sidings

At Huntcliff again and this time the sidings above the main drift are being dismantled in 1906

Dismantling Fan

Dismantling Fan

As the caption says it’s Huntcliff mine 1906.

Brotton

Brotton

Looking south 24th February 1973, or Brotton station as it used to be. Do you remember it like this?

William Horner tells us: ”yes I remember it well, I used to to go to the station to get the fish for my mother who had the fish shop in Jackson Street and Mr Mattson was the porter at the station”.

Thanks to William Horner for that update.

Sandsend, Lythe Bank and Railway Viaduct

Sandsend, Lythe Bank and Railway Viaduct

This is a lovely image, sadly of an age long past.  A BR Standard class 4 2-6-4T leads a commuter train (with that weird brake van) into Sandsend station across the viaduct.

Would You Enter This?

Would You Enter This?

Maybe I would ’cos I am nosey, it’s the entrance to the alum mine on Hummersea beach.

Chris Twigg tells us: ”Rather than a mine, it was connected by a shaft to the Alum House on the cliff top. Presumably to allow the transportation of goods in and out.The alum shale was actually been quarried on the cliff top to the west.”
(photo courtesy of Julie Morrisonand update from Chris Twigg)