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Lingdale mine 30th January 1957

Lingdale mine 30th January 1957

The effects of a roof fall in Lingdale Mine; the bent and twisted steel mine arches, are evident. The use of wooden pit props seem to be used to stabilise the roof.
Image courtesy George Pearson.

Parsons Byers Quarry

Parsons Byers Quarry?

This view of a double track railway incline, is believed to be one of several located in Weardale, so although outside our area has strong connections owi ng to the iron and steel industry, hence the inclusion on our site. The quarries were used for the limestone for the iron and steel industry.A similar arrangement was in operation at Ingelby incline, which was part of the Rosedale Railway. Chris Twigg tells us: ”The location certainly looks like it could be Parson Byers, which was owned by Bell Brothers and Dorman Long so a good chance of a picture ending up in our area”.   David Richardson also advises: ”Yes it is the incline head of Parson Byers Quarries, the track disappearing behind the trees to the right of the photo heads around to the main quarry.”

Very little changed at the incline between the 1890′s and 1920′s but the photo was likely taken in that 30 year period.

Any further information will be welcome.

Image courtesy of Maurice Grayson; also thanks to Chris and David for those updates.

Kilton Mine

Kilton Mine

A view of Kilton Mine it seems strange to compare this busy scene with the present day site, which with the sole surving ironstone shale tip in the district and a couple of derelict buildings, appears almost ghostlike today.

Image courtesy of George Pearson (via Jeff Templeman)

Can You Name Him?

Can You Name Him?

A photograph loaned to us by Dave Mc Gill, we asked who is he and what was his job at Skinningrove Iron and Steel works?

Brian Young tells us: ”I believe this is ? King works manager at the time.” Bob Doe assisted by telling us: ”He was the works manager and his first name was Bob”

Thanks to Brian and Bob for those updates.

Claphow Bridges

Claphow Bridges

It must have been a wet walk that day, judging by the dress of the miners and the shining road. We asked ”More importantly can anybody identify the men?” and Paula Miller now tells us ”This is the Moody brothers of Lingdale”.

Image courtesy of Jeff Templeman and many thanks to Paula Miller for that update.

Lingdale Mine and Brick Kiln

Lingdale Mine and Brick Kiln

A good image of the engine house at Lingdale mine. The round brick kiln on the right was part of an attempt to make the mine profitable, using shale from the tip (especially during slack times). It wasn’t particularly successful, but probably contributed enough to prevent total closure of the mine. Lingdale mine was one of the deepest mines in the Cleveland system and also had the poorest yield, there being a large band of shale splitting the seam in two. This resulted in the huge shale heap which took forever to dispose of! Lingdale village was described as almost derelict in the late Victorian era, the difficulty of winning the stone meaning that the mine was closed more often than in production.
Image courtesy Maurice Grayson.

Pit Horses

Pit Horses

Albert Dobson of Carney Street, Boosbeck; Gus Coote and Clarence ‘Clarry’ Ditchburn of Moorsholm leading out the mine horses on August 28th 1959. Because of the height of the ironstone seams, horses as opposed to ponies were employed in the Cleveland District .
Image courtesy of Maurice Grayson, with updated information courtesy of Alison Small and Lingdale History (Communigate). Thanks also to Ann Jackson and Janice Walker for the updates.

Skinningrove Mine

Skinningrove Mine

An early image of the mine; Deepdale valley has not been filled in with shale at the date of this photograph. The semi circular mine fan housing of possibly the Cooke ventilating fan, can be seen. The building and fan were replaced by a 30 foot diameter Waddel fan.

David Richardson tells us: ”Taken sometime in the 1890′s, both the 1872 and 1874 Cook’s Fan houses are visible with the Compressor House and Boiler Plant Chimney behind them. A little away from those to the right is the Hauler House for the South Drift.                                                                                                        On the hillside to the left of the photo is a large chimney which was the original furnace shaft for ventilating the North drift but was likely only used for a few years before the 1872 Cook’s fan took over.

Image kindly loaned by Michael Garbutt and many thanks to David for the update.

Lifting Bundles of Pig Iron With Crane

 Lifting Bundles of Pig Iron With Crane

On the Sand Bed in front of the Furnaces, a slinger guides a lift of Pig Iron. It was normal to use a flap of leather looped over the wrist to protect the hand from the still hot Pig Iron. the sand bed is cool enough to not need the wooden clogs normally worn. behind the slinger the impressions of the sow and pig channels can be seen in the sand bed.
From a Glass Plate Negative courtesy Dave Mcgill.

Stacking Pig Iron

Stacking Pig Iron

When the furnace has finished casting, the pigs are attached to the sow and the crew have to go around and break them off and heap them together, using the tongs they are holding and stack them into bundles ready for slinging. A Hard physical task.
Glass Plate Negative courtesy Dave Mcgill.