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Fillers

Fillers

We believed this image was of miners in Eston Mine. David Richardson came to the rescue telling us: ”Eston Mine in ‘Harry Scott’s Headwess’, about 1925. The men have just finished barring lose ironstone down from the roof in the top left hand corner of the photo. Tommy Seymour is breaking the stone apart with a pick while William Gill is loading the stone into the mine waggon.” Craig Hornby tells us: ”This I can confirm is Eston 1920 and if my memory serves me correct was taken in Park Headways district. ‘Headwess’ is extreme local pronunciation of ‘Headways’ ! The picture is one of a set (drilling/filling/timbering/barring) taken to illustrate an article written by then Eston mine Manager – William Grace – for the ”Iron and Coal Trades Review” magazine. The article was called ‘Stratified Ironstone Mining in Cleveland’.”

Photo courtesy George Pearson; with thanks to David and Craig for the updates.

Main Seam

Main Seam

This photograph can only have been taken in Eston Mine where the height of the Cleveland Main Seam reached maximum thickness here. The miner on the left is holding a light on the end of the pole to help with locating the prop. The sharpened point is very evident. Craig Hornby tells us: ”Again Eston in 1920 is confirmed. Part of a set of photographs taken for the ”Iron and Coal Trades Review”. Eston was the only Cleveland mine where deputies worked in gangs of three, due to the collosal size of the timbers, imported from Norway – apart from during World War I –  when imports were interrupted. The woods of Lazenby Bank, just below the 1871 bridge area/ SS Castle were harvested and transported via ‘The New Cut’ a new access route that linked up to the Lazenby-Guisborough cart road at the south-west corner of the present Wilton Golf course. The new cut and cart road are still there, leading down to the Conker Wood layby.   The timbers were taken via road to Eston Low Drum or The Tip Yard and sent in at Trustee. Timber was also harvested at this time from the plantations around pit-top and lowered down the ‘smokeshaft’ (Upsall No2). The old steam Engine house had been recently replaced by an electric hauler and was used to store timber. Source: George Appleby (Miner 1911-39) speaking to Craig in 1988/89 at age of 91/92 years.”

Image courtesy of George Pearson and thanks to Craig for complete clarification on this image and the working at Eston mine.

More Pick Work

More Pick Work

Two Deputys appear to be cutting holes for a baulk to support the roof in a Cleveland ironstone mine, believed to be Eston, but we await confirmation of this location. Craig Hornby gtells us: ”Fantastic picture! Never seen this one before. Wonder where it was taken. Still with candles in cloth caps so no later than 1930s when carbide came in…” Derick Pearson suggests: ”Due to amount of water sweating in on back face, could it have been Kilton or perhaps Duck Hole mine. They were both often wet like this. Also roof height is more in line with those perhaps?”

Image courtesy of George Pearson and thanks to Craigand Derick  for the updates.

Hand Drill

Hand Drill

A miner can be seen drilllng a hole for the charges. He is using a hand ratchet drill, the improvised platform he is standing on looks perilously shaky. David Richardson tells us: ”Image from Eston Mine, a miner drilling a shot hole in the thick seam district (with an average height of 16ft) using a hand rotary drill (likely a Blackett Hutton). Taken around 1925.” Craig Hornby now confirms the date and the reason for the image with: ”Eston 1920 for ”Iron & Steel Trades Review”.

Photo courtesy George Pearson; thanks to David Richardson and Craig Hornby for the updates.

Shotfirer

Shotfirer

After a hole has been drilled a shotfirer is seen charging the hole with an explosive from the wooden case the second miner is holding. The miners are wearing safety helmets, with headlamp fed from the battery pack on their hips, we are now reliably informed that the scene was from North Skelton mine in the 1950s.
Photo courtesy of George Pearson and many thanks to David Richardson for the update on location.

Pick Work

Pick Work

Two miners at the face in a Cleveland mine. The lack of safety helmets sSuggests an early date for the photo. The sharpened points of the pit props were a safety feature. When the points began to spread the pressure was increasing and remedial action needed to be taken.
Photo courtesy of George Pearson.

Skinningrove Station

Skinningrove Station

Skinningrove Station, on Carlin How Bank. A one platform station, it suffered badly from mining subsidence and had to be demolished.

Photo courtesy of George Pearson.

Railway Station

Railway Station

Believed to be Staithes Station, although Kettleness station was built to an identical design, Can anyone verify this information.

Image courtesy of George Pearson.

John Waddells Railway

More colloquially known as Paddy Waddell, John Waddell undertook other projects than the ‘renowned’ Paddy Waddells Railway; this intended to link up from Lingdale to the ironworks at Grosmont. This image shows his ‘navies’ working on the Loftus, Whitby and Scarborough line in 1883; making particular reference to the construction at all different levels. Hard labour indeed!

Image courtesy of R. F. Moore “Paddy Waddells Railway” printed by Whitby Literary and Philosophical Society

Cochrane’s South Bank?

Cochrane's South Bank?

Said to be a photo of ironworks at South Bank. Two blast furnaces with hoists and stoves can be seen on the left of photo. With iron melting cupolas on the end of the long foundry building on the right, possibly Cochrane’s works?

Photo courtesy Alan Richardson.