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Hand Drill

Hand Drill

A miner can be seen drilllng a hole for the charges. He is using a hand ratchet drill, the improvised platform he is standing on looks perilously shaky. David Richardson tells us: ”Image from Eston Mine, a miner drilling a shot hole in the thick seam district (with an average height of 16ft) using a hand rotary drill (likely a Blackett Hutton). Taken around 1925.” Craig Hornby now confirms the date and the reason for the image with: ”Eston 1920 for ”Iron & Steel Trades Review”.

Photo courtesy George Pearson; thanks to David Richardson and Craig Hornby for the updates.

Shotfirer

Shotfirer

After a hole has been drilled a shotfirer is seen charging the hole with an explosive from the wooden case the second miner is holding. The miners are wearing safety helmets, with headlamp fed from the battery pack on their hips, we are now reliably informed that the scene was from North Skelton mine in the 1950s.
Photo courtesy of George Pearson and many thanks to David Richardson for the update on location.

Pick Work

Pick Work

Two miners at the face in a Cleveland mine. The lack of safety helmets sSuggests an early date for the photo. The sharpened points of the pit props were a safety feature. When the points began to spread the pressure was increasing and remedial action needed to be taken.
Photo courtesy of George Pearson.

Skinningrove Station

Skinningrove Station

Skinningrove Station, on Carlin How Bank. A one platform station, it suffered badly from mining subsidence and had to be demolished.

Photo courtesy of George Pearson.

Railway Station

Railway Station

Believed to be Staithes Station, although Kettleness station was built to an identical design, Can anyone verify this information.

Image courtesy of George Pearson.

Cochrane’s South Bank?

Cochrane's South Bank?

Said to be a photo of ironworks at South Bank. Two blast furnaces with hoists and stoves can be seen on the left of photo. With iron melting cupolas on the end of the long foundry building on the right, possibly Cochrane’s works?

Photo courtesy Alan Richardson.

Off Tack

Off Tack

A miner’s pay slip 1943, less than a fiver for seven days hard graft on wartime rations. Explanation for younger viewers: a pay slip was called an ”Off Tack” because of the deductions from the wages.
Courtesy of Jeff Templeman.

All Lit Up

All Lit Up

No names on this photograph when loaned to us by George Pearson; believed to be underground at Lingdale Mine. Rachel Lee and Cathy Hood tell us: ”Far left is our Grandad, John Edward (Nap) Hood of Boosbeck.”

Can you name anyone?

Image courtesy of George Pearson and many thanks to Rachel Lee and Cathy Hood for the naming update.

An Assembly of Gentleman

An Assembly of Gentleman

Retirement of Thomas Davies, who was senior Blast Furnace manager at South Bank Furnaces. Seated in the middle of other
Officials. He lived at Cleveland House 1911, and came from Merthyr, to Bolckow Vaughan’s Works.
Image courtesy of Alan Richardson

Last Train

Last Train

Loftus Station on the last day of through passenger services to Scarborough on the Coast Line. May 1958.
Image courtesy of Alan Richardson