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Bell's Pit, Carlin How

Bell's Pit, Carlin How

Bell’s pit as it was known due to its ownership by Bell Brothers, at Carlin How. Bell Brothers were the creators of Bell’s Huts. The mine more popularly known as ”Duck Hole” (because of the very wet working conditions) was towards the end of its working life known as North Loftus Mine. Connections were made underground to Lumpsey and North Loftus Mines.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday. Collection.

Powerful Machines

Powerful Machines

Our image carried the caption on the reverse of: ”North Skelton Mine – Machine Shop”; however we are now advised by Simon Chapman: ”This shows the inside of the power station at Lumpsey Mine erected in 1903. You can make out four sets of machinery; each one comprises two vertical steam cylinders driving a generator. The chap is standing behind one of the generators, which is not revolving fortunately, as those unguarded rotors spinning round must have been highly dangerous, and probably sparked impressively.
This plant was installed to power drilling machines underground and also some lighting and pumping equipment. Now 110 years later the huge building has gone but the concrete foundations for these four machines still remain.”

Image courtesy of Olive Bennett and many thanks to Simon Chapman for this supporting information.

Lumpsey Ironstone Mine

Lumpsey Ironstone Mine

Further to our original posting of this image; Martin Fox tells us: ”The picture shows Lumpsey mine.” Also Simon Chapman tells us: ”This picture was indeed taken at Lumpsey Mine and is shown here the correct way round. It was taken in 1918 when the existing wooden headgear (with its lower wheels) was being replaced by a higher one made of steel. After the mine closed in 1954 the steel headgear was dismantled and re-erected at Waldridge Colliery in County Durham for a few years further use.”

Image courtesy of Olive Bennett and many thanks to Martin for the correction; also to Simon Chapman for the excellent supporting information.

Staithes Viaduct

Staithes Viaduct

We are now reliably informed by Russ Pigott: ”This is actually a picture of the demolition of Staithes viaduct in 1960. There weren’t too many diesel cranes about in the 1870s!” WHOOPS we got it wrong.
Image courtesy of a supporter of the Archive and many thanks to Russ for clarification of the image.

Skinningrove Railway Station

Skinningrove Station – ironically at Carlin How! But who were the two people in the photograph?

Image courtesy of Keith Bennison.

Steel Works Carlin How

Steel Works Carlin How

Under what seems to be a stormy sky the steel works appears to be a dark and dismal place. Blake’s ’Satanic mills’ again spring to mind.
Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers.

Skinningrove Mine and Carlin How Beyond

Skinningrove Mine and Carlin How Beyond

A view from Wood Road overlooking Skinningrove Mine buildings (but minus aerial ropeway) and Carlin How on the skyline.
Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers.

Skinningrove Steelworks Loco

Skinningrove Steelworks Loco

Greenbank a steel works locomotive with the proud staff.
Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers.

Staithes and Viaduct

Staithes and Viaduct

This hand tinted postcard shows how delicate the supporting piers of the Staithes viaduct were and give a greater understanding of how cross winds could affect trains on the structure.
Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers.

Easington Railway Station 1905

Easington Railway Station 1905

Easington railway station opened on 3rd December 1883 (as Easington) and was renamed Grinkle on 1st April 1904. This postcard image must have been taken shortly after the name change. The station closed in 1939, eight days after Britain declared war on Germany – start of World War II – and was situated before the railway line entered the tunnel under Grinkle Lane. It was accessible via a short lane from the Loftus Easington road. Easington railway station was built to a similar design to the stations of Staithes, Hinderwell and Kettleness
Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers.