Archives

Hydro Drill Again

Hydro Drill Again

This final image in our set is obviously of the Hydro Drill in use. Simon Chapman has been able to assist with details: ”This was a drilling machine introduced to North Skelton Mine during the 1950s for a trial. Although useful it took too long to move about and put into place compared with a hand-held power drill so was not adopted.”
Image courtesy of Olive Bennett and many thanks to Simon Chapman for his assistance in identifying the machine and the mine in which it was trialled.

Who Is Breaking the Law?

Who Is Breaking the Law?

Look carefully at the photograph one man is breaking the law can you see which one? The man standing on the left is mine manager Andrew Turnbull, so I am surmising that this is Kilton Mine? Simon Chapman has again assisted in answering our query, he tells us: ”This picture was taken at Kilton Mine in 1951 when the first diesel locomotive was introduced underground into the Cleveland Mines. The driver was Sidney Lightfoot.”
Image courtesy of Olive Bennett and many thanks to Simon Chapman for the update.

Sandsend Railway Station

Opened in 1883 Sandsend station at the foot of Lythe bank was at the northern end of the viaduct spanning the Sandsend valley. It closed in 1958, but this postcard view shows the station in c. 1900, perhaps the porter is moving boxes for the young lady?
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah.

Kildale Railway Station

An early 20th century view of Kildale station. The station master relaxes on the platform bench; as the woman and children look at the camera from the footbridge. Perhaps the stationmasters family? In 1901 this was Henry Bindoff, superseded by Thomas Carr in 1910, for one year; and John Watson in 1911.

Image courtesy of John G. Hannah. Further information on the railway at Kildale from ”Glimpses of Kildale” by Cedric Anthony.

Head Gear of Crags Hall Ironstone Mine

Head Gear of Crags Hall Ironstone Mine

A view of Crags Hall ironstone mine viewed possibly from the road linking Brotton and Carlin How. The mine operated from 1871 to 1892, the only indication of the existence of the mine is the cottages and farm on the hillside. The mine was named after the farm, the cottages came later and after the mine closed a collection of building, which stood below the road (now a grassy field) were known as Crags Hall cottages, they were demolished in 1966. Simon Chapman confirms our belief in the view: ”This view is from the road looking towards the sea. The two shafts shown here were south of the railway whereas the fanhouse (to left) was on the seaward side.”
Image courtesy of George Pearson and thanks to Simon for the update.

East Row Railway Bridge, Sandsend

East Row Railway Bridge, Sandsend

A northbound train of the Sandsend viaduct. I often wonder when this image was taken, knowing that my mother-in-law used to work on Bridling Station (in the railway buffet) pre WWII, but lived in Sandsend. She travelled daily; todays commuters have it easy. As the time spent travelling must have been considerable, owing to the pace of those local trains!

Image courtesy of Jean Carass & Maurice Grayson.

Hinderwell Railway Station

A view of Hinderwell railway station, from a postcard believed to be by T. C. Booth. Hinderwell railway station originally opened with one platform in 1883, but a second platform was added in 1908 (due to Board of Trade regulations), this gives a date to this image of post 1908 as a second platform can be seen nearest the camera.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holiday Collection and Maurice Grayson.

Kettleness

Kettleness

Our image shows a BR Standard locomotive, number 77012, standing at Kettleness Station, pre 1959. Another station which has found a new lease of life – as a Scout Activity Centre – the coast line being closed in 1958 some 5 years before Dr Beeching. Usage was only heavy in the summer, whilst the tunnels and bridges were expensive to maintain.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection and Maurice Grayson, particular thanks to Simon Chapman for pertinent information.

Skinningrove Works

Skinningrove Works

An interwar photo of Skinningrove Works.

A George Skilbeck postcard courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.

Workshop

Workshop

Previously shown on site as: ‘Ceramic Workshop’ we are now aware that it could not be the Loftus brickworks (where bricks were made from about 1830 to 1870s’) it is believed to be the workshops of the brick works at Commondale. In 1861, a Stokesley printer called John Pratt who owned land around the Commondale area did just that and set up his Cleveland Fire and Brick Company. The short-lived Commondale Pottery was set up by John Crossley, a retailer of building products from Stockton-on-Tees, on the site of a former brickworks which Crossley had acquired in 1872. The manufacture of art and domestic pottery was begun in April 1880, as an addition to the manufacture of bricks, tiles and pipes. The Commondale Pottery produced a wide range of domestic wares in both red and buff terracotta, some with elaborate painted and glazed decoration. After a short cessation in production and trading. The Commondale Brick & Pipe Works traded again from the late 1880s or early 1890s until 1947, when it closed. The brickworks site is now occupied by a Cleveland Scout campsite.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.