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Eston Station

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Eston railway station, circa 1910, the station opened to passengers on 1st January 1902. Later a canopy was extended over the platform to shelter the passengers; the roof of one platform signal box is just visible, the one at the other end of the platform was later removed. This was a short lived station, closing 11th March, 1929; a casualty of motor bus competition.
Image courtesy of The Pem Holliday Collection, additional information courtesy of “Disused Railway Stations”.

“Workers V.C.”

The Daily Herald, Instituted the Order of Industrial Heroism to recognise the ”Deeds of Valour” of those workers who had saved their fellow workers from danger of death. This became known as the ”Workers V.C.” Many of the recipients were awarded posthumously and also received other awards including the George Cross, George Medal and Royal Humane Society Medal. Just over 400 Workers V.C.s were ever awarded.
J.M. Easton (Overman at Loftus Mine, Skinningrove) was presented with the Medal at the Union Council Middlesbrough on 14th December 1946. He was the 177th recipient.

Information courtesy of TUC..

Skinningrove Mine and Loftus Valley

Skinningrove Mine and Loftus Valley

A panorama of Skinningrove valley. The mine is on the left, with overmen’s cottages next to the trestle bridge which crosses the beck to the drift into the bottom of Loftus north mine, the shaft used to hoist ironstone to the works. On the left the white enclosure of the newly built picking belt (1907), for cleaning the ironstone can be seen. Towards Mill bank, the mine rail sidings cross the beck this was originally extended to the old Whitecliffe mine. Kilton Viaduct is yet to be filled in, with Liverton mine above it. and the rail zig zag skirts the right hand side down the valley. Image courtesy of Jean Carass.

Skinningrove Mine

Skinningrove Mine

An interesting photo of the mine predating the installation of the picking belt (1907). the boiler chimney and steam from the Fan engine are clearly seen, The extensive stables complex for the mine horses (not ponys), dominates the centre of the photo. In the rail sidings a rake of wagons are loaded with ironstone. And towards mill bank is the stockyard stacked with timber for pit props. On The eastern side of the valley behind the mine is seen deepdale wood this slowly disappeared under a mountain of shale in later years.Image courtesy of Olive Bennett.

Skinningrove Station Before Beeching

Skinningrove Station when it was a working station; this view gives a proper idea of how close to Carlin How and how far away from Skinningrove. In the background right can be seen the chimneys of the steel works.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.

After Closure

Skinningrove Station and the buildings gone; only the platform and sign remain to indicate where it stood.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.

Egton Bridge and the River Esk

Egton Bridge and the River Esk

An early 20th century postcard view of Egton Bridge and the river Esk; how quiet it all seems.
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah

View of Glaisdale

View of Glaisdale

This postcard view was un-posted and we have no knowledge of the publisher; however from the handwritten inscription it is believed to be from the early 2oth century.
Image courtesy of John G. Hannah

Hydro Drill

Hydro Drill

This is the first of three images, all relating to the ’Hydro Drill’, We asked for further information. Simon Chapman has come to our rescue, telling us: ”Used on trial at North Skelton Mine in the 1950s but not adopted.”
Image courtesy of Olive Bennett and many thanks to Simon Chapman for the update.

Demonstration of the Hydro Drill

Demonstration of the Hydro Drill

This second image of the Hydro Drill is described as a demonstration, we asked ”Can anybody recognise the miners and perhaps name the mine and give us a date?” Simon Chapman explains: ”This was a drilling machine introduced to North Skelton Mine during the 1950s for a trial. Although useful it took too long to move about and put into place compared with a hand-held power drill so was not adopted. The miner at left in the dark waistcoat was Tommy Templeman who was a deputy and lodge secretary and lived in Richard Street, North Skelton.”
Image courtesy of Olive Bennett and many thanks to Simon Chapman for the supporting information.