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Timms Coffee House

 Timms Coffee House

Timms Coffee House, Skinningrove. A grade 2 listed building, built as Skinningrove Hall in 1704 to replace the Old Hall of the 1500s (now the Post Office) for the Easterby family. The Maynard family developed it as a hotel in the 1800s and named it Timms Coffee House after the coffee houses then popular in London. Karen Houdek tells us: ”The family owners leased the building to Martha Allinson, who transferred her ale license for the Buck Inn to the Skinningrove Hall building in 1875.  She and her husband George were proprietors of Timm’s Coffee House and Public House, in a different building in the 1861 census.  By the 1871 census their business was called the Buck’s Hotel. Martha ran the business solely when George died in 1872.  In September of 1875 her application to Magistrates to transfer her license from the Buck Inn to Skinningrove Old Hall was granted. The business was turned over to Martha and George’s son John sometime b/t the 1881 census and 1890, as listed in the 1890 Kelly’s Directory. Per the 1891 census Martha has moved to Linthorpe, Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire with her son William, and eventually dies in Middlesbrough in 1908. (An interesting little tidbit about the ties of the two families is found in the 1871 census, in which Martha and George’s daughter Margaret was employed as a servant for the Maynard family.)  John dies in April of 1890, and his wife Sarah runs the establishment until her death in August of 1901. The 1911 census shows George Hall as the proprietor.  The Halls are loosely connected to the Allinsons through marriage, with David Hall (George’s uncle), b. 1852 being married to John Allinson’s sister Ann Elizabeth, b. 1851.” Jill Wheatley tells us ” My gran and grandad – John (Jack) Shepherd – used to own Timms fro  1959 to 1975.”
Photograph taken in June 1964 by Ken Loughran, many thanks to Karen, Jill and Joanne for the updates.

4 comments to Timms Coffee House

  • Karen Houdek

    The family owners leased the building to Martha Allinson, who transferred her ale license for the Buck Inn to the Skinningrove Hall building in 1875. She and her husband George were proprietors of Timm’s Coffee House and Public House, in a different building in the 1861 census. By the 1871 census their business was called the Buck’s Hotel. Martha ran the business solely when George died in 1872. In September of 1875 her application to Magistrates to transfer her license from the Buck Inn to Skinningrove Old Hall was granted. The business was turned over to Martha and George’s son John sometime b/t the 1881 census and 1890, as listed in the 1890 Kelly’s Directory. Per the 1891 census Martha has moved to Linthorpe, Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire with her son William, and eventually dies in Middlesbrough in 1908. (An interesting little tidbit about the ties of the two families is found in the 1871 census, in which Martha and George’s daughter Margaret was employed as a servant for the Maynard family.) John dies in April of 1890, and his wife Sarah runs the establishment until her death in August of 1901. The 1911 census shows George Hall as the proprietor. The Halls are loosely connected to the Allinsons through marriage, with David Hall (George’s uncle), b. 1852 being married to John Allinson’s sister Ann Elizabeth, b. 1851.

  • Jill Wheatley

    My gran and grandad used to own Timms from approximately 1959 to 1975. John Shepherdson (Jack)

  • Joanne Nelson

    Jack Shepherdson was my mothers Carolyn Susan Shepherdson and my Uncle, John William Shepherdsons’ father. He later married Jill Wheatleys Gran when my Grandma Winnifred and Jack divorced following the war.

    Jack was in the Green Howards and fought a long and hard war part of which was liberating Bergen Belsen in Germany. Prior to this he was a professional cricketer who was encouraged by Lord Cayleigh, Brompton to go over the hills to play professionally at Normanby Hall. He took lodgings with my Great, Great Gran and fell in love with Winnifred Morgan Grange, my Grandma.

    I visited Timms coffee house as a child.

  • I have many great memories of staying at Timm’s from a baby till I was in my teens. Gran and Jack then moved into the village and we would keep in close contact with them. Visiting them very often.

    Timm’s Coffee House still exists in bricks and mortar but the name has been changed.

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