Recent Comments

Archives

Recent Comments

Archives

Final Queue

Final Queue

North Skelton. Miners queue for their last pay at the ”Bob hole,” It will be noticed they are wearing ordinary clothes , no issue of special gear in those days, some still carrying their carbide lamps, and in their pockets bottles and containers which held water or cold tea, ”No Canteen” underground in the good old days!

However Bill Danby tells us: ”My brother-in-law, Frank Holmes, who was the last Deputy out of North Skelton Ironstone Mine in 1964 states that this is unlikely to be a photograph of the last day at the mine. One of the miners is carrying a carbide lamp and another a candle, whereas, Frank says, North Skelton mine was one of the first to start using electric lamps. Or the picture was a set-up for the occasion. Frank worked most of his life down the mines, first at Lingdale, where in the 1953 disaster he helped carry out the lads burnt in the explosion of methane. On the closure of that mine he transferred to North Skelton. After retiring he volunteered to help at the Skinningrove Mining Museum and put the roof up in the tunnel where they demonstrate what life down there was like.” Bill also suggests ”There is much information on North Skelton Mine from its opening in 1872 on my website ’ The History of Skelton’”
Photo courtesy Jeff Templeman. Many thanks to Bill for that update.

‘Bob Hole’

"Bob Hole"

North Skelton Mine; the last pay packets, being paid at the accounts office window called the ”bob hole”, on the 17th January 1964. Can any one  help with identification of the Miners?

Leo Howard tells us: ”The first man in the queue wearing beret. His name was Willi Wnek. He was Polish and was the fitter.”
Photo courtesy Jeff Templeman and thanks to Leo for the update.

North Skelton Rescue Team

North Skelton Rescue Team

North Skelton Mine First Aid and Rescue team.
Left to right: Jack Teasdale, John Hobson, Harry Beadnall, George Garland, Mine Manager George Pearson.

Richard Beadnall tells us: ”This is my granddad, Harry Beadnall. He was on the mine rescue team at Lumpsey before moving to North Skelton until it closed. He died not long after leaving North Skelton.”

Photo courtesy Jeff Templeman and thanks to Richard for the update.

Apprentices

Apprentices

Photo taken at the back of North Skelton mine fitting shop. 1954.
Left to right Tony Calvert app’ electrician, Colin Wheatley app’ fitter, Tiny Dunston app’ fitter, Allan Richardson app’ fitter, Jeff Templeman app fitter.
photo courtesy of Jeff Templeman.

Mine Fitting Shop Staff

Mine Fitting Shop Staff

North Skelton Mine Fitting Shop Staff 1954.
Standing: Jeff Templeman (apprentice fitter), Steve Bottomley (fitter), Ron Harding (fitter’s mate), Bill Turnbull (fitter), Dennis Stangoe (fitter).
Kneeling, Alan Richardson (apprentice fitter), Tiny Dunston (apprentice fitter).
Photograph courtesy of Jeff Templeman.

End of an Era

End of an Era

The last mine to close in Cleveland, North Skelton Mine seen in it’s final month of 1964.
Image courtesy of   Jeff  Templeman

 

South Skelton Mine

South Skelton Mine

Well I couldn’t go wong with this photo could I? The name of the mine and the owners in plain site on the photo which was loaned to us by Eric Johnson. The mine was situated close to Boosbeck and closed in 1954.

Longacres Pit Skelton

We haven’t many photographs of Longacre mine at Skelton, which was not as well known as many of the others in the area. Joan Webster tells us: ”Nice picture of Longacre mine where my father (Jack Robinson) was deputy manager.”
Photograph courtesy of George Pearson; thanks to Joan Webster for the update.

Longacre Mine Skelton

Once again a lovely drawing of Longacre ironstone mine, long gone now, but still remembered; the former site is close to the present day Asda store and the public house which bears the name “The Longacre”.
Image courtesy of Joan Webster.

Pit Horses

The caption on this photograph was “Mine horses  out to graze during holidays near Claphow, North Skelton mine in the background.” Derick Pearson has advised: “This is at the high side of Clap How (Clapper) bridges; travelling from New Skelton to Lingdale involves passing under Clap How bridges. Turn left off the road immediately after the bridges and up a dirt track to where these fields are/were. On the left of the photograph you can see the farm house which is below the railway and the bridges. To the right is North Skelton mine as said in the original title; the underpass which goes under the railway lines is also visible. Martin Fox adds: “Looks like building in background could be what was called the Gas House. The Payne’s lived there; Ethel and George (my gran and grandad); Margaret (my mam), Doreen, Anne, Brian and Arthur (my aunts and uncles). There used to be a gas holder near to the house.”

Image courtesy of several sources, thanks to Derick Pearson and Martin Fox for the updates.