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Ship Ashore

Ship Ashore

This was the Freja Svea, weighing 97,000 tons and was grounded on the beach at Redcar just off Majouba Beach car park  on 1st March 1993.

Thanks to Derick Pearson for the update.

Honoria

Honoria

The Honoria beached in 1901 at Marske, three Redcar fisherman drowned in attempting to rescue the crew of this steam trawler.

Fred Brunskill advises: ”The ‘Honoria’ was aground and four of the local Picknett family were amongst the seven aboard their coble which had set out to assist the stricken boat. Longtime serving lifeboatman Thomas Hood Picknett was very lucky to survive as their boat was overturned as it was caught up in rocket lines.. On that fateful day, Thomas lost his two sons, John and Edmund and also his brother Richard.”

Thanks to Fred Brunskill for the update.

Ship on Westscar

Ship on Westscar

The reason I posted this photo is because I love it, now gentlemen or ladies can you tell me anything about it?

Fred Brunskill tells us: ”The brig ‘John and Mary’ left Portsmouth for Sunderland carrying ballast when she was forced ashore at Saltburn on 28th October 1880.”

Thanks to Fred for the update.

Lochalsh

Lochalsh

1897 and another ship is ashore off Saltburn, this time the Lochalsh

Wrecked at Saltburn, 7th May, 1924

The ’Ovenbeg’ was carrying a cargo of china clay from Fowey in Cornwall to Grangemouth in Scotland when she was driven ashore, just to the west of the pier, by a strong gale.  This postcard view (by E. Graham of Redcar), shows the initial stage of this drama; it was hoped to re-float her as the weather moderated during the day of 7th May.  At nightfall the gales blew up again and repeatedly smashed the ship against the pier.  Eventually she broke through, causing a 70m gap, and finally washing up on the beach at the other side of the pier, a mangled wreck.”

Image courtesy of Kathleen Hicks, additional information from ”Piers of Disaster by Michael Easdown”.

Schooner ‘Ovenbeg’

The upper image of this postcard shows a view of the ’Ovenbeg’ from the beach.  It was hoped to refloat her as the weather moderated during the day of 7th May, 1924.  At nightfall the gales blew up again and repeatedly smashed the ship against the pier.  Eventually she broke through, causing a 70 metre gap and finally washing up on the beach at the other side of the pier; a mangled wreck.

Image courtesy of Kathleen Hicks, information courtesy of “Piers of Disaster” by Martin Easdown.

Man The Lifeboats

Man The Lifeboats

Believed to be the Ovenbeg, before she ran into the pier at Saltburn 7th May 1924.

Thanks to Derick Pearson for the update.

Yendis 1921

On 23rd October 1921 the Yendis went ashore at Saltburn, under those towering cliffs of Huntcliffe, which must have been quite daunting to those poor sailors. The crew were rescued and the ship refloated on 14th November 1921. Rev. D. Hobman advised the Archive: “My grandfather was Captain of the Yendis.” Rev. D. Hobman has further assisted with some more information regarding the Yendis: “Captain Henry Hobman was in charge at the time and along with the crew was his wife Annie. the Yendis was eventually sold to the Dundee Perth and London Shipping Company in 1935 and renamed the Rosyth. She then plied her humdrum trading pattern along the east coast of Scotland, mainly between the Forth and Tay. During a routine call at Perth in 1947 she sank at her berth but was successfully refloated and continued her upriver service for another two years. In 1949 she was acquired by George T. MacLennan, Dundee and employed in the sand and gravel business as the David P. However, her life in this hard- working industry was not without its ‘ups and downs’ so to speak. She was abandoned off Newport, Fife, in a winter’s gale in January, 1952 but later reboarded and towed to Dundee. Four years later, in 1956, she finally foundered near the Middle Bank just upstream of the Tay Road Bridge, and the following year her hull was dispersed by explosives and her shattered remains eventually brought ashore as scrap.

Image courtesy of Mike Holliday, additional information regarding the Yendis courtesy of “The Times Reports”; thanks to Derick Pearson and the Rev. D. Hobman for the updates.

Yendis.

Pitchforth (Photographer and postcard printer) of Saltburn was the photographer of this scene and I know it is the Yendis as the name is quite visible, now known to have come ashore at Cattersty end of Skinningrove beach. According to stories the Captain’s wife was taken ashore and possibly stayed at Timm’s Coffee House, until the vessel could be refloated. Rev. D. Hobman has already advised the Archive: “Captain Henry Hobman was in charge at the time and along with the crew was his wife Annie.” Other information supplied by Rev. Hobman is on the accompanying post.

Image and information courtesy of Kathleen Hicks, thanks to Rev. D. Hobman for the update.

SS Sylviana

SS Sylviana

Skinningrove in the background. We are told: ”SS Sylviana was registered West Hartlepool. It looks like it ran aground after loosing the propeller.”

Thanks to Margaret Snowdon(Raspison) for the update.