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A view from Old Saltburn

A view from Old Saltburn

This view over the Ship Inn clearly shows the Rocket House and Mortuary, prior to the improvements to the Brotton road which required demolition of the Rocket House. We asked: can anybody suggest a date for this postcard view? Callum Duff rescues us again: ”Improvements to the Brotton Road necessitated the demolition of the Lifeboat house as the former office of the Rocket Brigade can still be seen in this photo, next to the mortuary. The Alexandra Hotel has been painted white and the old bathing machines have disappeared so this photograph is definitely post World War II. Coupled with a white weatherboarded pier building with glass screens, I would date this postcard around 1960.”

Image courtesy of Maurice Grayson and thanks to Callum for the information and dating.

Saltburn from Huntcliff

Saltburn from Huntcliffe

This early postcard view of Saltburn shows a varied collection of buildings along the shore before you can make out the Ship Inn and beyond. Callum Duff assists with dating with this detail: ”This photograph was taken sometime between 1920 – 1935. According to English Heritage the beach chalets were built between 1920 and 1929, a period which also encapsulates the building of The Beach Cafe (now Vista Mar). In 1935 the Spa Pavilion was extended adding the concrete apron of front windows which survive today.”
Image courtesy of Maurice Grayson and thanks again to Callum for the additional information.

Top promenade at Saltburn

Top promenade at Saltburn

The Archive believed this was possibly late 1920s/1930s view of Huntcliffe and the top promenade at Saltburn; but what was missing were many of the present day seaward facing buildings. Callum Duff has come to our aid, explaining: ”All the seaward facing building and structures between Hazelgrove and the west side of the Cliff Lift were built between 1918 and 1939 as part of a government scheme to ease unemployment. They included; footpath improvements, railings, rose arbours, the rock garden, Jack’s Castle, Public Toilets, the large pillared shelter known locally as ‘The White Elephant’ the sunken shelter adjacent to it and a concrete pond which has since been filled in. The beach chalets, shelters and the bandstand may also have been part of this employment scheme, together with the widening of the pathway from the foot of Hazelgrove to the beach.”

Image courtesy of Maurice Grayson and many thanks to Callum for dating this image.

Saltburn Promenade

Saltburn Promenade

A quiet day at Saltburn, sometime in the 1960’s. A sunny day, but with few visitors.

Postcard courtesy of Maurice Grayson.

Windy Hill

Windy Hill

”Photo taken from Windy Hill” states the caption of this postcard. From the look of coastal erosion on the cliff a very unsafe place to set up a camera.
Postcard courtesy of Maurice Grayson.

Ship Inn Saltburn

Ship Inn Saltburn

This glass plate image of The Ship Inn in Old Saltburn obviously predates the improvements to the Brotton road. Callum Duff advises us: ”The building to the right is actually the Lifeboat House, demolished after the auction of Saltburn’s last lifeboat in 1924 (The Mary Batger) and also to allow the road to be widened.” To the right of the Lifeboat House was another row of cottages which included a further two public houses: the Dolphin Inn, the Nimrod Inn; two gin shops and a shop. The cottages extending to the left of the view beyond the Ship Inn are much more extensive than today. This probably means the image is pre 1924, unless we can be advised otherwise?
Image courtesy of Geoff Patton; many thanks to Callum for updating our information and datings.

Italian Garden Saltburn

Italian Garden Saltburn

The Italian Gardens Saltburn, in immaculate condition. First laid out in the 1860s by the founders of modern Saltburn the Pease family.

A Frith Postcard courtesy of Maurice Grayson.

Old Cat Nab

Old Cat Nab

An early tinted postcard of Cat Nab, with the farm and mill buildings in the foreground. The hay stacks with their thatched conical covers are seen at the bottom left; a once common sight on farms.

Postcard courtesy of Maurice Grayson.

Hazelgrove No2

The development of the Hazelgrove area can be clearly seen by comparing this photograph with Hazelgrove no1. Most obvious being the number of chalets , sadly all gone now!

Postcard courtesy of Maurice Grayson.

Hazelgrove No1

Hazelgrove before the chalets were built, it is interesting to compare this photo with Hazelgrove No 2.

Postcard courtesy of Maurice Grayson.