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A Saltburn (& Marske-by-the-sea) LNER Poster

A Saltburn (& Marske-by-the-sea) LNER Poster

One of a series of posters produced by LNER 1923 – 47 promoting tourist resorts and possible places of interest. Reproductions of many of these posters (some as postcards) can be purchased today via the National Railway Museum and tourist information centres.
Image courtesy of a supporter of the Archive.

Saltburn Convalescent Home

Saltburn Convalescent Home

Saltburn House as it is now known was opened in 1872 at a cost of £12,000 by Messrs Pease as a Convalescent Home for their workers. The home became a temporary base for Silcoates School in Wakefield after it burnt down in 1904. The rebuilt school, still open at the time of writing, offers assisted aid to pupils with what is known as the ’Saltburn Bursary’ in memory of the link with the town. The house was later sold to the Working Men’s Club and Institute Union (”the CIU”), which converted it into a convalescent home for club members, one of several around the country. Its ”residents” usually came, from all the major working-class areas of the UK, for subsidised two-week breaks. They were easy to recognise from the yellow button badges they were issued by the ”Superintendent” on arrival. Subsequently bought by Hayes Working Men’s Club it has since been renamed ”Saltburn House” in 2014.
Image courtesy of a supporter of the Archive (from a postcard view).

Saltburn Cliff Lift

Saltburn Cliff Lift

The cliff lift is one of the world’s oldest water-powered cliff lifts (the oldest being the Bom Jesus funicular in Braga, Portugal). The Saltburn tramway, as it is known, replaced a vertical lift, which was closed on safety grounds in 1883. The cliff tramway opened a year later and provided transport between the pier and the town. The railway is water-balanced and since 1924 the water pump has been electrically operated. The first major maintenance was carried out in 1998, when the main winding wheel was replaced and a new braking system installed.
Image courtesy of a supporter of the Archive.

Saltburn Minature Railway

Saltburn Minature Railway

A puzzle for our knowledgable viewers. We said the loco appears to be Prince Charles, but without the overall fairing. And the whole train seems to be running on one rail ? On the car park fairground caravans can be seen. Date 1940’s early 1950’s. However Callum Duff gives us the answer: ”The locomotive seen here is ‘Blackolvesley’ which was renamed ‘Elizabeth’, possibly because of the coronation. This locomotive was used as the ‘spare’ after ‘Prince Charles’ was purchased in 1955.”

Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers, but especial thanks to Callum for solving the mystery.

Marske Mill

Marske Mill

An early tinted postcard view of Marske Mill, beside Skelton Beck and slightly north of the railway viaduct. How in the time of this image the valley must have reverberated to the sound of the train passing overhead.

Donkey Cart of Saltburn Urban District Council

Donkey Cart of Saltburn Urban District Council

An early refuse cart for the Council, possibly dating from the 189os. I could not have carried a vast amount as the donkey appears quiet small. Can anybody assist with a possible date or even information?
Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers.

Saltburn Pier in Stormy Weather

Saltburn Pier in Stormy Weather

An early image of the pier complete with small building at the end. The sea looks a little tempestuous, hardly surprising that there is not a person in sight! Callum Duff tells us: ”The building at the end of the pier is a bandstand with protective wooden and glass screens inset from the pierhead railings. The bandstand survived until after WW2 where presumably the fashion changed and it was removed as part of Saltburn Pier’s post war improvements.” Peter Appleton assists with: “The pier was heavily damaged by severe storms during, I think, the 1980s. The storms destroyed the middle section of the pier. The surviving landward end was consolidated, after much campaigning by local residents, and the seaward end, which still included the shelters on all three sides, was demolished, leaving the pier that we see today. I believe it is now the most northerly pleasure pier on the east coast.”
Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson and Keith Bowers, thanks to Callum Duff  and Peter Appleton for updates.

Saltburn Cliff Tramway

Saltburn Cliff Tramway

Opening in June 1884 the Saltburn Inclined Tramway replaced the vertical hoist of John Nicholson. possibly the world’s oldest water balanced cliff lift, the main winding wheel was replaced for the first time in 1998. Restored recently complete with stained glass windows it remains a useful way to avoid the climb from either the pier or the beach. We have been advised by Callum Duff: ”The Vertical Hoist at Saltburn was built by the Saltburn Improvement Company’s chief engineer, John Anderson who also built The Alexandra Hotel on Britannia Terrace (now Marine Parade) and was instrumental in the building of Saltburn pier.”
Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers, thanks also to Callum for the update..

View from the Bridge

Reliable Series postcard (dating from pre-1905) view seemingly taken from the Halfpenny Bridge, despite the title applied to the postcard as “View from the Viaduct”. Any view from the viaduct would not have been able to see as far as the coast!
Image courtesy of Kim Whaley.

Rifts Wood

Reliable Series obviously liked the green woodlands at Saltburn, unfortunately as an unused postcard dating is more imprecise; however with the card being hand-tinted in style it is probably from the early 1900s.
Image courtesy of Kim Whaley.