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Jetty Bank

Jetty Bank

Steam driven hauler on jetty bank about 1914.

(photo courtesy of Eric Johnson)

Steel Works 1914

A long time ago on Skinningrove works  the ’barrows’ are there some still laden, they must have been very heavy for one man to push when fully loaded, each barow is numbered and I am supposing each man had his own barrow.

This further image of Mine Barrows in use at Skinningrove works also dates from about 1914, showing barrows already filled with ironstone awaiting hoisting to the furnace tops. Robert Silkstone pointed out the importance of these images: “these tubs are rarely photographed at ground level. They are the tubs that were taken by men who hand charged the blast furnaces before the conveyor system was introduced. The shape of the tub is deleberate to allow charging at the top of the furnace.Eric Johnson explained their use at Skinningrove works: “At Skinningrove ironworks the term ”mine” refers to the ironstone carried in the barrows which came from the company’s Loftus mine, this stone was roasted in kilns and the calcined ironstone was taken from the kilns to the weigh machine cabin. Then weighed and the barrows hoisted to the furnace top, emptied and returned. Coke and limestone were also carried in the barrows, but they were always known as ”mine barrows”. Steven Partlett was able to confirm this analysis with:My father worked these after Loftus mine closed and he moved to the Ironworks. What is not obvious in these images is that the ground where they operated was completely covered in plates which were either Steel or Iron. The barrows had a knife edged wheel, similar to a flanged rail wheel. The combination reduced friction, and made it easier to push the loaded barrows. The area was known in the works as “the plates” because of the feature.” These plated areas can be seen if careful attention is paid to the lower areas of these images.

Image (from a glass plate negative) and information courtesy of Eric Johnson, also thanks to Robert Silkstone and Steve Partlett for the updated information.

Blast Funrnace Men

Blast Funrnace Men

1880 is the date on the photo, not the kind of men I  would like to meet on a dark night, but the hours were long and the pay was small.

(photo courtesy of Eric Johnson)

SS Skinningrove

Ss Skinningrove

The caption on the photo says it all.
(once again thanks to Derick Pearson for the photo)

Iron And Steel Works

Iron And Steel Works

Yes I know we have some aerial photos of the works but this one is lovely and clear you can even see the line going onto the jetty, it is suggested by Simon Chapman that this dates from about 1967. The sinter plant is still working and blast furnace still stands in this image.
(photo courtesy of Cleveland Mining Museum and thanks to Simon for the update)

Banner

Banner

An Iron and Steel works banner for the Cleveland district. Do you know any more about it?
(photo courtesy of Ceveland Ironstone Mining Museum)

Site Picture

Site Picture

This I found very useful as if you like me had looked at various aerial photo’s of the steel works and wondered which part was which. Well wonder no more this photo tells all.

Unusual View – Skinningrove Jetty

The only time you would have got this view a few years ago was if you were on the steel works, but it does show the jetty off very well.
Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.

Skinningrove Works, 2006

Thanks to Owen Rooks for this photograph and following caption: ”This is a shot I took from a helicopter of the works site in June 2006. I don’t know what goes on there these days so I’ll leave it to the experts to identify any noteworthy features!”

Image and commentary courtesy of Owen Rooks.

Nearly Finished

The caption for this photograph originally stated: “Bridge across jetty bank nearing completion, July 1950”; sadly it no longer exists! Some sixty years later even the jetty is no longer used by the steelworks.

Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.