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Two Photographs

This double image is presented just as received by the Archive; the top photograph was taken at Staithes. David Richardson identified this with: “The top photograph was taken at Staithes, taken on the Cowbar side with the main village in the background.” The lower image is of the Staithes ladies in their bonnets, looking to the east and the Old Nab headland.

Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection and thanks to David Richardson for the update.

 

Staithes

A much photographed area of Staithes or ’Steers’ as the locals call it, Cowbar on the left of the picture, Staithes on the right and the fisherman tending his boat in the middle. This image is from an earlier period than any of the Archive’s other views of Cowbar and Staithes; with no footbridge linking the two communities.

Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection. 

Staithes

A colour-tinted postcard view of Staithes Beck, looking upstream to the footbridge and viaduct; the card is potmarked July 14th, 1905.

Image courtesy of Beryl Morris.

Cowbar

A Frith’s postcard view showing the steepness of Cowbar bank, those cottages are still standing and just a little of Staithes showing on the left.

Cowbar

Lovely old image of Cowbar; believed to be from the early 1900s but can anyone assist in a date?

Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.

Staithes Harbour

This view of the Staithes Harbour comes from the ”Cooke’s Views of Loftus and District”. A lovely, peaceful image, the boats hauled up on the beach, Cowbar Nab curving protectively round the village.  No wonder it’s a popular visitor spot.

Image courtesy of John G. Hannah.

The Eighth Wave!

The wave after the wave that wrecked The Cod and Lobster?  Another extremely dynamic image of the storm – I bet the photographer sold the seventh wave image to the North-Eastern Gazette! There’s an old fisherman’s saying that the seventh wave is the highest when the tide comes in; I used to spend ages on Redcar beach counting waves as a result of this!

Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection (and believed to be from a series taken by John Tindale – Photographer – Whitby).

Staithes Battered by Storm Force Seas

An extremely dynamic image of the North Sea hammering the sea wall at Staithes during the storm that wrecked The Cod and Lobster public house.

Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection (and believed to be from a series taken by John Tindale – Photographer – 0f Whitby).

 

Now that’s what I call a party!

Not really a party – this the result of serious storm damage to The Cod & Lobster public house in Staithes, captured in a dramatic sequence of photographs taken at the time. Jackie Roe-Lawton told us: “When the pub was washed away, Willis – a building firm from Hinderwell – was employed to rebuild it. My Granddad, John Tom Roe was a cabinet-maker; he renovated and rebuilt the cellar. The woman who was the landlady was so penny-pinching that she just covered over the ale barrels – and remember, these were wooden barrels, not the metal sealed ones that we have now – you had to tap the barrel to get the beer out – but she usually just took the lid off!! Imagine how much sea-water was in that brew! My Great Granddad, John Henry Roe (The eponymous barber from Barber’s Yard) was an alcoholic; so my Granddad never drank. But every lunchtime he staggered up the High Street, singing his head off, drunk from the fumes!
When the windows were replaced, Granddad took the old windows from the Cod and Lobster; fitted them in the top of his house at 3 Broomhill with the help of my Dad, Tommy Roe. They took the roof off, installed a dormer (the window from the Cod) and put the roof back on; watertight; in one day. That window was still serviceable when my husband took it out and replaced one dormer with 2 smaller in 1998!”

Image courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection (and believed to be from a series taken by John Tindale – Photographer – Whitby) and many thanks to Jackie Roe-Lawton for that update.