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Redcar in Colour

Redcar in Colour

Plenty of beach attractions for the kiddies on Redcar beach in this postcard. The small red train as well as the pony and trap are unusual rides, we asked ”When did they operate, can any one help with dating?” and Josie Harvey has told us: ” These pictures were taken in early 1960′s the pony rides operated at the end of Turner Street & went to the 1st slipway towards Coatham. The pony pictured was called Molly, the pony rides were operated by Harry Sturdy (I think his wife was Lil) there were 5 or 6 ponies of various sizes; smallest named Tiny, the biggest was Smokey. The ponies were kept in a field at the back of York Road; you were offered a ride back to field at the end of the day if you helped by leading them up & down all day (always lots of willing helpers!). The cart was very bumpy to ride in I seem to remember, I think the rides were 3d a go. The train operated from just past the bandstand, as did the rocket. I think they alternated direction the train ran for a number of years before and after the rocket, both were garaged at the back of Turner Street.”

Margaret Perkins advises: ”I was one of the helpers, Harry paid you a small amount and this always ended up back in his pocket as it was spent on pony rides! Topper and Dinky were another two of the ponies, I can remember kneeling on the sand with Topper’s head resting on my shoulder, he would nod off to sleep. I went to help at Red Lion Riding School after this holiday job.”

Postcard courtesy of Maurice Grayson and many thanks to Josie and Margaret for the updates.

3 comments to Redcar in Colour

  • Josie Harvey

    These pictures were taken in early 1960’s the pony rides operated at the end of Turner Street & went to the 1st slipway towards Coatham. The pony pictured was called Molly, the pony rides were operated by Harry Sturdy (I think his wife was Lil) there were 5 or 6 ponies of various sizes; smallest named Tiny, the biggest was Smokey. The ponies were kept in a field at the back of York Road; you were offered a ride back to field at the end of the day if you helped by leading them up & down all day (always lots of willing helpers!). The cart was very bumpy to ride in I seem to remember, I think the rides were 3d a go. The train operated from just past the bandstand, as did the rocket. I think they alternated direction the train ran for a number of years before and after the rocket, both were garaged at the back of Turner Street.

  • Margeret Perkins

    I was one of the helpers, Harry paid you a small amount and this always ended up back in his pocket as it was spent on pony rides! Topper and Dinky were another two of the ponies, I can remember kneeling on the sand with Toppers head resting on my shoulder, he would nod off to sleep. I went to help at Red Lion Riding School after this holiday job.

  • A Etherington

    The Santa Fé Express was run by friends of my mother. Floss and Bill. Floss took the money and Bill drove. They ended up as brown as berries at the end of the season. Their surnames I can’t help you with but the time was at the end of the ’50s and the start of the ’60s. It seems to have been a petrol-engined “loco” and pulled the trailers for about 100 yards one way and then returned. I suppose the tide had something to do with the running.

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