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Saltburn Promenade

Saltburn Promenade

An early twentieth Century photo of Saltburn. The beach, pier, and promenade are busy on a glorious summers day. The two-storied structure in the foreground, appears to have an open viewing platform, so we asked ”Does anyone have any information as to it’s purpose? Callum Duff has told us: ”The two-storied structure on Saltburn’s lower promenade was built as a shelter but also served as covered viewing area for theatre productions and Pierrot shows which took place on the promenade opposite. A makeshift stage was set up (later made more permanent with an iron legged structure behind) and the two ramps either side of this served as ‘stage left’ and ‘stage right’. For shows comprising many parts but few cast, the area behind the stage was probably used for quick costume changes. Popularity in these shows declined with the advent of TV and the permanent stage was destroyed in the great storm of 1953 and never replaced. A building of similar design to the base of this structure survives as Saltburn Surf School and there are what look like original steps at the back of the building.” Callum also advises: ”As an addendum to my previous post, I have been informed that the current Surf School is housed in the ground floor section of the original building. The upper cast iron floor was removed around 1960, either due to deterioration of the structure or because Victorian architecture was deemed to be unfashionable. The steps were truncated to the rear to prevent anyone climbing on a roof that now had no safety railings. In my youth this former shelter was used to store deckchairs and other beach equipment for hire. It also looked rather sorry for itself until it was rescued by Nick Noble and his Surf School.”

Image courtesy Ken Johnson and many thanks to Callum Duff for the updates.

2 comments to Saltburn Promenade

  • Callum Duff

    The two-storied structure on Saltburn’s lower promenade was built as a shelter but also served as covered viewing area for theatre productions and pierrot shows which took place on the promenade opposite. A makeshift stage was set up (later made more permanent with an iron legged structure behind) and the two ramps either side of this served as ‘stage left’ and ‘stage right’. For shows comprising many parts but few cast, the area behind the stage was probably used for quick costume changes. Popularity in these shows declined with the advent of TV and the permanent stage was destroyed in the great storm of 1953 and never replaced. A building of similar design to the base of this structure survives as Saltburn Surf School and there are what look like original steps at the back of the building.

  • Callum Duff

    As an addendum to my previous post, I have been informed that the current Surf School is housed in the ground floor section of the original building. The upper cast iron floor was removed around 1960, either due to deterioration of the structure or because Victorian architecture was deemed to be unfashionable. The steps were truncated to the rear to prevent anyone climbing on a roof that now had no safety railings. In my youth this former shelter was used to store deckchairs and other beach equipment for hire. It also looked rather sorry for itself until it was rescued by Nick Noble and his Surf School.

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