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The Promenade and Beach, Saltburn

The Promenade and Beach, Saltburn

A photograph contemporary with that in ”Saltburn, A Renaissance”, only taken from Cat Nab (as far as I can tell).  This shows the roundabouts where the boat park is now. I think this dates into the 1960’s. Tony Auffret tells us: ”I think this was still there in 1960. The “amusement” on the far right was a “waltzer”. There were “swing boats” behind along the edge with the beach.” Callum Duff has a dating update: ”This postcard image was taken between 1962 (when the boating lake was completed) and 1974 (no postcards images of Saltburn were produced between 1974 and 1978). The Waltzers remained on this site until 1978 and the rest of the rides and buildings had been removed by 1983.”

Many thanks to Tony Auffret and Callum Duff for the updates.

4 comments to The Promenade and Beach, Saltburn

  • I think this was still there in 1960. The “amusement” on the far right was a “waltzer”. There were “swing boats” behind along the edge with the beach.

  • Callum Duff

    This postcard image was taken between 1962 (when the boating lake was completed) and 1974 (no postcards images of Saltburn were produced between 1974 and 1978). The Waltzers remained on this site until 1978 and the rest of the rides and buildings had been removed by 1983.

  • Rick Avern

    Does anyone know who owned these rides in the 60’s. I think they belonged to someone who lived just up the hill from them on the right hand side.

  • Alan Collins

    My mother worked in the cafe and beach shop, owned by the family who also owned the little fairground. To the right of the bog waltzer was a rifle range with metal targets that were knocked over with the .22 rifles. The family who owned the fairground, beach shop and cafe lived in the farm house, on the other side of a little wooden bridge, behind where this photo was taken. My family arrived from Enfield Middlesex in 1949 and we stayed at the Alexandra hotel for a night, before moving into my father’s brother’s house at 28 Victoria Street, opposite the YHA overlooking Riftswood. I have sent you a photo of myself and my brother in a boat and my sister in another on the boating lake, with a view of Cat Nab behind us – which was taken in 1949 during our first trip to the beach with our parents. Callum Duff is obviously mistaken about when this image was taken, because I left Saltburn at the age of 15 in 1959. The lake was dismantled and drained around 1954 because I remember playing with Jimmy Brotton when I was aged about 12 years (1956) in a hand made space-ship built on the sands under the bridge, when the boating lake no longer existed. Jimmy and I also played in the wooded valley behind that farmhouse, and raced match-box boats from the footbridge bridge outside that family’s farmhouse down to where the stream joins Skelton Beck. That stream was pure clean water in the 50’s full of shoals of tiddlers. Every year during the second half of the 1950’s a travelling fairground was parked on the land where you can see a car park, next to a toilet and changing rooms. I think that rectangular building was used as a First Aid centre, or something else, as well. When I visited Saltburn this century, that stream was pouring red oxide from the the old mines up-stream, into Skelton Beck. The family also owned the shop (behind where you can see a small brick cemented paddling pool behind white wooden railings, which was also dismantled in the early 1950’s). It sold sweets, icecream, postcards, and the usual stuff – but my mother persuaded the owners to serve hot food, after she had closed a shop that we owned in the street next to the cinema in Milton Street. She sold hot pies and peas on hot plates from that shop on Saturdays. We were there during Queen Elizabeth’s coronation, because I remember the street party, and three-legged races balancing boiled eggs on spoons in that street. My father purchased 28 Emerald Street, after we sold that shop. Before working in the beach restaurant she was a waiter in a corner shop at the other end of Milton Street, where she served a meal to me and my brother after school was over. Then we also ate tea after school in the beach cafe, when my parents were separated and my father had moved into “digs” beside the railway station in Redcar. I’m sorry that I have forgotten the name of the family, even though my brother and I were friends with their two daughters, during our teenage years between 1957-58 (when I was 14 years old) until when my mother disappeared to London with my older sister (when my father began divorce proceedings which she did not want to offer any defense about her repetitive infidelity) leaving my father to return home from Redcar to look after us. However, I know that that family also owned a shop along the bottom promenade, next to the cliff lift, opposite the pier. I hope this information is helpful in some way. Yours truly, Alan John Collins.

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