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United Bus at Redcar 1920s

Eamann O Ruairc tells us: “The man standing in front of it is my grandfather, Michael (Mick) Magee. He began working as a driver, but since he was a very skilled mechanic (he had served his time as a motor mechanic and had spent World War I as a driver in the Army Service Corps on the Western Front) he was soon put to work as a mechanic in the depot in Dormanstown. During his stay in Redcar; Mike became deeply involved in trade unionism and in socialist politics. At some point he became the chauffeur of a Fabian MP. Whether this was a full-time job or a part-time one I do not know. Mike may have worked for the Transport Workers Union and was also very active in the organisation of the 1926 general strike. In 1930 he emigrated to Detroit where he became a key figure in the trade unions in the Ford factories”. Craig White tells us: “Looks like Redcar Lane Cemetery chapel in background , so this would be Thwaites Lane running up to the Racecourse stands”.

Image and information courtesy of Eamann O Ruairc; Eamann is also seeking further information about United Bus Company in Redcar in the early 1920s. Thanks to Craig White for the update regarding location of this image.

Tivoli Cinema at Carlin How – 4th December 1914

A postcard view of the Tivoli Cinema at Carlin How; the day after the fire! It obviously collected a number of sightseers and mostly young people judging by this view of the day after; the Archive has been advised by Bill Kitching “the Tivoli was left derelict after it burned down and was actually still in use before the fire; it was effectively the community centre and had theatre productions as well. He and other kids would later play football in the space it used to  occupy. In this photograph there is a small group of three men in the foreground on the left in front of a post. The slightly shorter man on the right with his hand in his pocket is my fathers’ father Joe Kitching who worked at the pit  and the man to the left of him with his hands together was a Mr Bayfield who was the horse-keeper at the pit.”

Image and information courtesy of Bill Kitching via Geoff Kitching.

Mr French’s House after Fire January 11th 1908

Callum Duff has advised the Archive: “The house in your photograph is in fact, ‘Manesty’ on Marske Mill Lane. Building commenced on this house in 1905 and was originally called ‘The Homestead’ but was damaged by fire during its construction in 1906. Partly rebuilt in 1907 by Cackett and Burns Dick of Newcastle upon Tyne for Major H, R. French. The house was bought in 1919 by a Mr Hutchinson who lived in the adjacent house then called Manesty; he changed name of this house from Homestead to Manesty. ‘Manesty’ is a vernacular revival house of sandstone with ashlar dressing and is one of Saltburn’s listed buildings.

Image courtesy of Julie Tyrka and many thanks to Callum Duff for the update.