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Loftus War Memorial Dedication

Loftus War Memorial Dedication

At 2pm on 11th November, 1922, (one year after the end of registration of deaths due to the War or its effects), the Memorial at Loftus was formally consecrated. Built by Mr. C. Hebditch the Celtic Cross, to a design by B J Wormleighton;made of Cornish granite, stands on a site in the High Street donated by Lord Zetland.  Mrs. G. Locker (who lost two sons in the conflict) and Mr. W. Hoggarth D.C.M. performed the unveiling of the monument that commemorates the dead of the First World War.  The total cost of £815 was raised by donations and collections.  Sir Hugh Bell was guest speaker, the service was conducted by ministers of all religions, each taking a part of the service.

The guard of honour and firing party was provided by 4th Battalion, Queen Alexander’s Own, the Yorkshire Regiment, also known as the Green Howards. The local Battalion of the local Regiment had recruited so many of the men whose names were inscribed on the bronze tablets at the base of the Celtic Cross.

In the background can be seen Oliver’s buildings – a house and a coachhouse, a butcher’s shop and three cottages – which were owned by the Catholic Church and later demolished.

Image courtesy of Eileen Hicks and many thanks to Stuart Cole for information regarding the guard of honour and firing party.

 

Ship Inn Marske

Ship Inn Marske

A postcard view of The Ship Inn Marske, this popular village amenity is a Grade II listed building and described in the Listed British Buildings as: “A very complete example of an Inter-War, Roadhouse type public house.” The building was dating from 1932, although this was a site on which have stood a succession of similarly named buildings. The mock Tudor timber framing originated from the battleships HMS Collingwood and HMS Southampton; the two battleships being scrapped between 1909 and 1912 by Hughes-Bolckow in the north east of England.

Image courtesy of John G. Hannah.