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Athina Livanos 1937

Athina Livanos 1937

This postcard shows the beaching of SS Athina Livanos (incorrectly named by the printers!) and despite the Greek name; she was a 4824 ton steamer built by Grays of Hartlepool and completed in October 1936. The beaching took place on 28th February 1937, so the ship was brand new and probably en route to its new owner. It ran aground on Redcar beach; which when beached was an attraction for residents and visitors from all around, named after the 2nd daughter of shipping magnate at the time Stavros Livanos. This daughter later married Aristotle Onassis and mother of two children Alexander and Christina.
The Athina Livanos was lost on 29th November 1943 when it was torpedoed in the Gulf of Aden by the Japanese submarine 1-27.

Image courtesy of John G. Hannah, additional information courtesy of ‘Redcar – Past and Present’.

Old Church, Skelton

Old Church, Skelton

A postcard view of the old church of All Saints Skelton, from Skelton based B. and G. Spires; the Spires produced several hand-tinted postcard views of Skelton and the surrounding area during the early 1900’s. Peter Appleton tells us:  “The original church was probably erected by one of the Fauconbergs, who inherited the Castle upon the death of Peter de Brus III without issue. His eldest sister, Agnes, married Walter de Fauconberg and thus the estate passed into the hands of that family, until their male line died out in 1407. The name on the Faculty for the pulling down and rebuilding the church is Joseph William Hall Stevenson, who inherited the estate from his father, John Hall Stevenson, in 1785. The rebuild cost £443.2s.7d according to the Church Wardens’ Accounts Book and took place during 1785 and 1786. The cost was covered by a donation of £100 from Joseph, the sale to the parishioners of the pews in the nave, east gallery (no longer extant) and west gallery, plus the sale to the local plumber of the lead recovered off the roof. Several other prominent citizens also signed the Faculty.” The interior retains many old fittings, including a three-decker pulpit. Part of an old 11th century stone sundial found in the church yard is now in the new church.”

Image and additional information courtesy of Peter Appleton.

Rushpool Hall pre-1904

Rushpool Hall before the Fire

Rushpool Hall is one of the finest specimens of Victorian architecture to be found in North Yorkshire. It was constructed at the head of the valley gardens in Saltburn-by-the-Sea in the years 1863-4 for Mr John Bell, one of the Victorian pioneer Ironmasters of Bell Brothers a company that controlled and worked the ironstone mines at Skelton-in-Cleveland. It seems logical that the magnificent Rushpool Hall was built with the first ironstone raised from Bell Brothers Skelton Shaft mine. After John Bell died in 1888, Sir Arthur Dorman (of Dorman Long Iron & Steel Works) moved in. Sir Joseph Walton, coal mine owner, active Wesleyan Methodist and Liberal Party MP purchased the property after it was renovated in 1906 following the great fire in 1904. The Hall was almost destroyed when a maids candle accidentally caused a curtain to catch alight. The construction of the outer walls built from ironstone mined in the Bell brothers Skelton shaft mine is probably the main reason why the Hall survived the fire. It is today a hotel and premier wedding and function venue. This image produced by Rapp’s of Saltburn as a postcard, clearly titled as ‘Before the fire of 20th February, 1904’; it must have been very topical at the time!
Image courtesy of Peter Appleton, additional information courtesy of Rushpool Hall.

Ladies in Church

Ladies in Church

Gill Brown, Lilian Ingledew and Iris Copley are similarly pictured during another visit to St Gregory’s Minster at Kirkdale.

Image courtesy of Iris Place.

Church Visit

Church visit

Lilian Ingledew and Tom Jackson are pictured whilst visiting St Gregory’s Minster at Kirkdale. Kirkdale’s most famous monument is the ANGLO-SAXON SUNDIAL situated just above the main doorway under cover of the 18th century porch; still much visited today the church is a peaceful haven, well worth visiting .

Image courtesy of Iris Place.

West End Skelton

West End Skelton

Still a familiar view of North Terrace, Skelton; this postcard view dates from the turn of the 2oth century. The Royal George whose host was A. (Albert) Bunn as recorded in the 1901 and 1911 Census; it is presumed that the Royal George  lost the front railings in the First World War.Even today the building still exists, more as a ‘pub with good grub’; than a ‘commercial hotel’. Peter Appleton has assisted with further information regarding Albert Bunn: “Alfred Bunn was born at Abington, Cambridgeshire in 1850. He married Hannah Ord at Middlesbrough Register Office in 1878. He was a Coachman in Domestic service, living at 15 Stanhope Street, Saltburn in 1891. This is just round the corner from the Queen Hotel. Was he the hotel’s coachman, I wonder? By 1897 he was landlord of the Royal George and was elected a member of “Skelton Felons” (or Skelton Association for the Prosecution of Felons to give it its full title) in that year. In 1910 he was elected to the management committee of “the Felons” and is last mentioned in the Minute Book of the Association in 1915. He died in March 1917.”

Image courtesy of Peter Appleton and many thanks to Peter for the update.