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Loftus Views

Loftus Views

Three images grouped on a Richardson postcard view of Loftus. Particularly interesting is the central image of the railway station with multiple tracks between the platform, allowing trains to pass.
Image courtesy of Margaret & Michael Garbutt

Seymour Hill

Seymour Hill

A lovely shot of Seymour Hill. What date would you put on this photo? We think early 1900s>

Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers; an update of an image originally posted courtesy of the Pem Holliday Collection.

Loftus War Memorial

Loftus War Memorial

This postcard image of Loftus War Memorial shortly after the opening ceremony in 1922. We can see the war memorial and the lions head pouring out water, with some of the older houses of Loftus in the background.

Image courtesy of Margaret & Michael Garbutt.

Loftus Market Place

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Taken from the west we can clearly see the shop of  C.J. Dodd & Co; the Presbytery in the background and the original shop with living accommodation above in the building now the Co-op. A hand tinted postcard produced by H G Glen & Co of Leeds pre 1913.

Image courtesy of Margaret & Michael Garbutt.

Seymour Hill Terrace

North Road Loftus, looking uphill towards Seymour Hill on the way to North Terrace. A scene virtually unchanged from the present day. The shop on the right is now a private residence. But the new housing estate is beginning to appear at the top of the hill.
Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers.

Cammell’s Shop

A Bruce postcard view from 1904 showing how the story of ’A race between a camel and a lion’ came about. No doubt the owners revelled in the story as people would possibly travel to see this ”event” and hopefully patronise their shops! Norman Patton tells us: “Elizabeth Ann Hicks, who was the mother of Charles and William Hicks of Tees Street who were killed in action during World War I, was also my grandfather’s Mum. She was the daughter of a veterinary surgeon, Charles Cammell, who practiced at Sculcoates, a suburb of Hull. Her brother, also Charles Cammell was the owner of Cammell’s ’boutique’ shown above in Loftus Market Place. His wife, Albina, was his business partner and his sister my great-grandmother, was their assistant. My mother, Betty Patton and her sister Cath Winspear (formerly Watson) along with several other sisters also lived at 26 Tees street and were often used as ‘models’ for the ladies’ hats which their grandmother used to make at home.”
Image courtesy of Ann Wedgewood & Keith Bowers, thanks to Norman Patton for the update.

Zetland Road Loftus Early 1900s

This view of Zetland Road shows the original brick pavements and unmetalled road. How the pram on the right of the image must have been vibrated as it was pushed along on the pavement. Notice also the absence of the now familiar red post box on the support wall for the monumental masons displays.
Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson & Keith Bowers.

Before or After?

Before or After?

This glass plate image shows four gentlemen take their ease on the footbridge over Whitecliffe Beck on Glover’s Path at the foot of the steps up to Liverton Mines. Now was this before or after the steps have been navigated?
Image courtesy of Geoff Patten.

Skilbeck’s Loftus

Skilbeck's Loftus

A delightful postcard with views of Loftus and District produced by George Skilbeck. All the locations can be visited today, but how they have changed.
Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson and Keith Bowers.

Newton Memorial Chapel Loftus

Newton Memorial Chapel Loftus

A wonderful hand tinted postcard view of the chapel – bombed on 15th March 1941 and now replaced by two bungalows – the remains of the graveyard which surrounded the chapel can still be seen today. Norman Patton tells us: ”Robert Newton,  to who’s memory this chapel is dedicated,  was born and lived at Home Farm in Roxby which is where my wife, Margaret, lived with her mum and her sister when I met them in the early 1960s.  Hazel McLaren,  Margaret’s  mum,  had married  Joss Welford , a tenant farmer,  some 7 years after losing her husband,  Hugh,  in the final week of World War II. On a separate matter,   I would like to know  if there is a record of Baptisms,  Marriages and burials kept locally for the chapel?”
Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson and Keith Bowers, with many thanks to Norman for that update.