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Bank Top Garage

Bank Top Garage

Do you remember Tommy Fletcher’s garage at Bank Top and his buses? Roy Jacklin tells us: “I moved from New Marske to Liverton Mines in 1964. I worked shifts at ICI Wilton but not being interested in sporting activities I needed something to fill in my spare time. A friend suggested asking Tommy Fletcher if there was a driving job vacancy. I didn’t have a bus licence but could drive his taxis. The cars were Austin Princess’s. Most of the work was with Mr Garnetts Funeral service. In those days you were paid 25 pence for driving the car and a further 25pence as Poll Bearer. I remember when I first went there I noticed one of his cars had slipped down the bankside behind his garage. Tommy said it was a sign of the times. The land was slipping away into the beck below. The rest is history, due to further landslip the garage eventually closed. I remember Tommy and his sons Alan and Thomas as great company, always joking.”. Whilst Emma Verrill tells us: “I’m Alan Fletchers grand-daughter, I was reading Roy Jacklin’s comment to my mam and nanna and my mam (Irene Fletcher) said she remembers Roy working there and remembers him coming into Walter Wilsons, I’m looking for some photos of my grandad’s garage if you know anywhere I can find any can you let me know please?”

Image courtesy of Joan Yeoman, also thanks to Roy Jacklin and Emma Verrill for the updates.

Loftus Landslip 1927

Loftus Landslip 1927

A view of the landslip 27th September 1927, at Bank Top, Loftus (viewed from Liverton Mines), which unceremoniously dumped this building into ’The Narrows’ and caused the premature demise of others! This occurred long before the more recent and memorable events, which forced road closures and diverted traffic. The underlying strata is boulder-clay, which holds a phenomenal amount of water – before collapsing along shear-planes, like this!

Any further views of this event would be welcomed.

Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson.

Close – up Landslip 1927

 

Close - up Landslip 1927

A view of the damaged house at Bank Top, Loftus after the 1927 Landslip. The house was subsequently declared unsafe and demolished. Norman Patton advised us: “Dougie Breckon of “Breckon and Shaw” in Loftus has told me on occasion that his Grandparents lived in the house at Bank Top, Loftus, which was demolished in the Landslip!”

Many thanks to Norman for that update.

 

Leaving Party

Leaving Party

Customers and friends gather at Mr. and Mrs. Roberts ’This is Your Life’ leaving party. Pictured (left to right): Mr. and Mrs. Simpson, Mrs. Connelly and Mariessa Robinson, Mrs. Roberts, Sheila Brown, Ernie Stone, Gordon Welford, Myra Watson (back, in the sunglasses), Mary Breckon, Ethel Welford, Marjorie Hodgson with Rachael Burton. Sam Robinson is in the doorway. “Wonderful day, wonderful times, wonderful people”

Thanks to Marjorie Magor for the photo and information, also Michelle Robinson for the names update.

Brick-built now

Brick-built now

Mr. and Mrs. Roberts built the business up and eventually had the shop rebuilt with brick.

Image and information courtesy of John Roberts.

Bank Top Shop

Bank Top Shop

The 1927 landslip at the top of Loftus bank destroyed Magor’s house and shop. They moved over the road and had a wooden shop built in the gap between Valley Avenue and the two semi-detached houses. Richard Magor who owned the original shop died in 1958 at 1 Queen’s Road Loftus, having previously lived in Carlin How.
Mr. Jack Roberts bought the premises and started in business in 1950. He also traded with a horse and cart, before getting a van. He later traded from another shop in 25 New Company Row in Skinningrove, formerly Hart’s shop. The Skinningrove shop was originally owned by John and Alwynne Jefferson (parents of Barbara McBurney) who sold the shop to Harts.
This picture shows John on Laddie’s back, with his father standing beside the cart, at the top of Loftus Bank.

David Archer tells us: “Richard Magor who owned the shop that was destroyed by the landslide was my Great Grandfather who died while living at No. 1 Queens Road Loftus in 1958 he had previously lived in Carlin How.”

Barbara McBurney tells us: “The shop Jack Roberts owned at 25 New Company Row in Skinningrove, was where I lived when I was born, it was called Jeffersons, we moved to Loftus when my brother was born as there were only two bedrooms in the shop but kept the shop for a number of more years, my mother and father, John and Alwynne Jefferson (nee Smith) commuting to Skinningrove each day to work in the Shop. Malcolm and Sheila Hart from Skinningrove moved in when we sold the shop and I believe Jack Roberts took over after the Hart’s left.”

Image and information courtesy of John Roberts; also to David Archer for the updates on Richard Magor and Barbara McBurney for updates on the Skinningrove shop.

1953 – Windows for the Queen

1953 - Windows for the Queen

In this photo the shop windows are decorated to celebrate the coronation of Elizabeth II in June, 1953. Mr. Roberts and John are sitting on the steps. Barbara McBurney tells us: ”The man walking into the picture from the left is my Great Uncle Edward Boyes, he was my father (John Jefferson’s) Uncle, brother to my Grandmother Elizabeth Ann Jefferson nee Boyes, he lived at 16 High Row and had a hen run at the top of Mill Bank, he visited our house regularly when I was young and passed away September 1966.”

Image courtesy of John Roberts and thanks to Barbara McBurney for the update.

A Few Years Later

A Few Years Later

Mr. and Mrs. Roberts took photographs of the shop over the years. I think this one was taken in the early sixties. Jack Roberts is sitting on the step and John is standing in the doorway.

Image courtesy of John Roberts.

Waiting for the Delivery

Waiting for the Delivery

Mrs. Roberts and the dog are watching as the goods are delivered to the shop in Spring, 1969.

Image courtesy of John Roberts.

This is Your Life

This is Your Life

Mr. and Mrs. Roberts inside the shop with Mrs. Frost, who is behind the loaf of bread, holding the red book.

Image and information courtesy of Marjorie Magor