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Street Houses – Primitive Methodist Chapel

Street Houses – Primitive Methodist Chapel

Built in 1872 the Primitive Methodist Chapel at Street Houses, the former chapel now forms part of the farm buildings of Street Houses Farm. The stables beside the chapel experienced the Zepplin raid of 1916. Considerable burning took place, which is still evident in the rafters of the stables. The chapel (now in the process of repair by Tony Garbutt) survived to this day, despite being ”modified” for use as a barn by previous farm owners.

Streethouses

Street Houses

The children had must have been told the photographer was coming and are eagerly waiting for their photo to be taken. Streethouses was once a thriving community, large enough to warrant this primitive Methodist Chapel, which was opened in 1872. The cottages of Streethouses to the left of this image (stood on a slight angle at the junction of the track from Easington and the Boulby road) have long since been demolished along with Arthur Fields, Micklow Cottages and Rockcliffe Cottages. Street Houses, Primitive Methodist Chapel (AD 1872) and thePrimitive Methodist Chapel at Arlington Street Loftus (AD 1870) are unusual, they are both aligned north/south instead of east/west as other christian churches are. This may be peculier to Primitive Methodists (or a faulty compass). Eric Johnson tell us: ”I was baptised at Arlington Street and I don’t know the answer.”

Iain Warnes was born at Upton and christened in this chapel in 1939, his grandfather Walter Warnes, had a small farm at Upton. His great uncle Aaron Rolling had a smallholding at Hummersea next to Tommy Hart.

Supplementary information supplied by descendants of Tommy Hart.

Deepdale Wood

Deepdale Wood

A plate from a book of views of Loftus.

A Busy Day!

A Busy Day!

I love this photo, two buses on Mill Bank , so it must have been a busy day.  Duck Hole pit is clear as is Kilton Mill.

Is It A Race?

Is It A Race?

That is the thought that came to mind as I looked at this photo and saw the man by the side of the bus, or was it like Lythe bank when the bus was full those standing had to walk to the top?  A lovely peaceful scene you wouldn’t see Mill bank so clear of traffic now.

(photograph courtesy of Kathleen Hicks)

Postcard from Picturesque Loftus

Postcard from Picturesque Loftus

What better way to tell your parents about the place you lived in when you were in Service.  In the days before digital cameras and camera ’phones, when the post cost a penny for next day delivery.

Loftus, A Postcard

Loftus, A Postcard

What a lovely place to live shows Loftus to it’s best advantage, now I have been nosey, (well I am noted for it) and read the back of the card. This is what is written,

Thought you would like to have these views of Loftus, you will notice the Regal cinema where Race’s used to be.  We used to love Camel’s shop Mother and father live in Dalling’s house, my sister Nora married Harold Legg and lives above their shop in Zetland Road, all the best Marie.

There now you are as nosey as me and we know why the crosses are on the photo, thats my excuse and I am sticking to it.

Picture Postcard – Loftus

Picture Postcard - Loftus

Another picture postcard of picturesque Loftus – you should see some familiar images!

An interesting comment from Eric Johnson: ”The postcard is interesting from an industrial archaeology view, showing the aerial bucket tipping arrangement at the top of Liverton Mines shale tip. Postcard is probably pre 1918.”
Thanks to Eric for the comment.

Picture Postcard – Loftus

Picture Postcard - Loftus

This is a pretty picture postcard extolling the virtues of Loftus.  These were a popular way of telling the folks at home what your new location looked like in the days before holidays and easy travel.

East Loftus

East Loftus

An aerial view of East Loftus, showing the United bus garage (latterly Arriva, now closed) on the far right, with the playing field behind it.  To the right of the garage is the cricket field with the bowling green just visible at the end of it.  A lovely clear view of the streets and to the far left you can see the cemetery, the road in the  foreground is the A174 to Whitby.