Archives

West Road After 1906

A view of the houses on the south side of West Road, built by Charles Hebditch after building the Congregational Church in 1906. Bryan Richardson tells us: ”The last house on the row was built in 1911. It was lived in by the Dodds family before they moved to the top of West Park Avenue. My Grandfather bought it for £750 in 1942 after leaving Kilton Mill. It remained in our family until April 2011.” Malcolm Watson has told us: ” The first house ( nearest the camera ) was probably Durban House, which was where Jane Harrison (nee Durban) lived in 1911 after the death of her husband Thomas Harrison in 1910. Thomas Harrison was the son of my great-great grandfather. He had a hardware shop in Loftus High St.”

Thanks to Bryan Richardson and Malcolm Watson for those updates.

West Road

We think this photograph was taken in West Road, Loftus, c.1958. Carolyn Richards is the little girl skipping along the pavement, followed by her brother Mike. Ken Johnson has advised us: “The bus is a Saltburn Motor Services (Kelly Watsons), which ran from Saltburn via Spa bank to Loftus.”

Image courtesy of Carolyn Richards and thanks to Eric Johnson for that update.

West Road

Looks as though most of the residents have come to have their photograph taken as the man with the camera came to West Road in Loftus, we can just make out the Town Hall in the background. This from a postcard dated 27th September 1907.

West Road 1903

West Road 1903

Taken from the west we see an unmade West Road, prior to the building by Charles Hebditch of the houses on the south side in 1906.

West Road 1914

West Road 1914

Another view, looking east, along West Road taken after the houses on the south side were built. A note on the back of the card reads: “1914 I should say.” The gas lamp post could be one my grandfather made; he made the first one for Loftus,  …….. made the gas lamp burners.”

Mars House

Known to most as the Mars Inn and originally known as Marsh farm house (owing to the soft ground in the area); this house was owned by Mr Eaton of Loftus Brick Works, where bricks were made from about 1830 to 1870. Bryan Richardson tells us: ”The original name of this house was Marsingill House. I researched this around 1980 when I was landlord of the Mars Inn and the sign was changed from Mars the Roman god to Mars the planet and people argued as to which it should be. Neither as it turned out.”

Image courtesy of Mrs Sakelaropoulos and thanks to Bryan for that update.

 

The Empire, Loftus

Yes this is the way it used to look not at all like the building we see today, but when the silent movies were something new this is where people went to see them. There were live acts too between the movies, I remember my mother telling me of the ’scratching shed’ a place where they waited to get into the Empire, makes the mind boggle as to what the scratching shed was, anybody out there enlighten me? Please!

Image courtesy of the David Linton Collection and Maureen Hogan (from a Loftus Town Crier Calendar issue).

Cliff Crescent

Cliff Crescent

This is the first postcard that I’ve seen of Cliff Crescent. I remember when it was counter service in the Co-op, but not as far back as this when the door was on the corner.

Bank Top Garage

Bank Top Garage

Do you remember Tommy Fletcher’s garage at Bank Top and his buses? Roy Jacklin tells us: “I moved from New Marske to Liverton Mines in 1964. I worked shifts at ICI Wilton but not being interested in sporting activities I needed something to fill in my spare time. A friend suggested asking Tommy Fletcher if there was a driving job vacancy. I didn’t have a bus licence but could drive his taxis. The cars were Austin Princess’s. Most of the work was with Mr Garnetts Funeral service. In those days you were paid 25 pence for driving the car and a further 25pence as Poll Bearer. I remember when I first went there I noticed one of his cars had slipped down the bankside behind his garage. Tommy said it was a sign of the times. The land was slipping away into the beck below. The rest is history, due to further landslip the garage eventually closed. I remember Tommy and his sons Alan and Thomas as great company, always joking.”. Whilst Emma Verrill tells us: “I’m Alan Fletchers grand-daughter, I was reading Roy Jacklin’s comment to my mam and nanna and my mam (Irene Fletcher) said she remembers Roy working there and remembers him coming into Walter Wilsons, I’m looking for some photos of my grandad’s garage if you know anywhere I can find any can you let me know please?”

Image courtesy of Joan Yeoman, also thanks to Roy Jacklin and Emma Verrill for the updates.

Loftus Landslip 1927

Loftus Landslip 1927

A view of the landslip 27th September 1927, at Bank Top, Loftus (viewed from Liverton Mines), which unceremoniously dumped this building into ’The Narrows’ and caused the premature demise of others! This occurred long before the more recent and memorable events, which forced road closures and diverted traffic. The underlying strata is boulder-clay, which holds a phenomenal amount of water – before collapsing along shear-planes, like this!

Any further views of this event would be welcomed.

Image courtesy of Joyce Dobson.